Dairibord Holdings Limited HY2010 Interim Report

first_imgDairibord Holdings Limited (DZL.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Food sector has released it’s 2010 interim results for the half year.For more information about Dairibord Holdings Limited (DZL.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Dairibord Holdings Limited (DZL.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Dairibord Holdings Limited (DZL.zw)  2010 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileDairibord Zimbabwe Private Limited (DZL Holdings Limited) is the largest dairy company in Zimbabwe; producing and marketing a range of fresh milk and ready-to-drink and long-life milk products. The company also owns Lyons Zimbabwe; a food company that manufactures and markets ice-cream, cordials, condiments and spreads, tea and mineral water; ME Charhons which manufactures biscuits and baking products; and has a majority stake in Dairibord Malawi. The company is wholly-owned by Lavenson Investments Private Limited and is the flagship subsidiary of Dairiboard Holdings Limited. DZL Holdings Limited owns four property companies; Goldblum Investments (Private) Limited, Chatmoss Properties (Private) Limited, Quallinnex Properties (Private) Limited and Slimline Investments (Private) Limited. Its export markets include Zambia, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique and South Africa. Dairibord Zimbabwe Private Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Could the Lloyds share price have further to fall?

first_img Rupert Hargreaves | Saturday, 2nd May, 2020 | More on: LLOY I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Rupert Hargreavescenter_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. The Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) share price has not been able to escape this year’s market sell-off.Year-to-date shares in the bank have fallen about 46% excluding dividends as investors have become increasingly concerned about the UK’s economic outlook.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…However, following this decline, shares in the lender appear to offer a wide margin of safety. But is now the right time to add the stock to your portfolio or could the Lloyds share price fall further?Lloyds share price valueAt first glance, the Lloyds share price looks cheap. It is changing hands at one of the lowest levels of the past decade. The stock now looks even cheaper than it was at the dark days of the financial crisis.This seems unwarranted. Lloyds is much stronger than it was back in 2008. What’s more, the financial system as a whole is not on the verge of breaking down today, as it was in the financial crisis.That being said, at present, the outlook for the economy is exceptionally tough. We’ve not experienced a period of disruption as severe as this in recent memory.However, the economy has always experienced booms and busts. On every occasion, the economy has come back stronger over the following few years and decades.This suggests that while the near term outlook for the Lloyds share price is uncertain, over the long run, operating conditions for the FTSE 100 bank are very likely to improve.As such, buying the bank at this low level could lead to high returns in the long run.Future income championAs the lender has recently cancelled its dividend for the foreseeable future, investors are unlikely to achieve any income from the Lloyds share price in the near term.Nevertheless, during the past few years, Lloyds has become a FTSE 100 income champion. This suggests that when regulators allow UK banks to resume dividends, investors could be well rewarded.Of course, at this point, it is not very easy to tell what sort of returns investors could achieve from the Lloyds share price over the next few years.But the company’s past performance gives us some guidance.For example, City analysts were forecasting a total dividend of 3p per share for the lender in 2020. It may be some time before this level of income returns, but if it does, investors buying the stock today can look forward to a 9% dividend yield.In 2019, Lloyds distributed 3.37p per share. At this level of income, investors buying today would see a yield of 10%.There’s no guarantee Lloyds will resume its dividend plans this year, so this is not guaranteed. Still, these numbers show just how attractive the risk/reward ratio is for the stock after recent declines.So, while the Lloyds share price could fall further in the near term, longterm investors may be able to generate market-beating returns buying the lender today. Rupert Hargreaves owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Could the Lloyds share price have further to fall?last_img read more

The stock market crash hit this FTSE 100 stock hard. Should I consider investing £1,000 in it now?

first_img Image source: Getty Images I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Manika Premsingh Manika Premsingh | Saturday, 27th June, 2020 | More on: IHG Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended InterContinental Hotels Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. The stock market crash hit this FTSE 100 stock hard. Should I consider investing £1,000 in it now? “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Enter Your Email Address The stock market crash hit the hospitality industry hard. Along with airlines and tourism providers, hotels, restaurants, and pubs stocks were dumped by investors at speed. Stocks like the Intercontinental Hotels Group (LSE: IHG) are among them. But the tide has turned. I’d consider investing £1,000 today in IHG today. If I had bought IHG at its lowest price during the stock market crash, an investment of £1,000 would have a value of a little over £1,500 by now. The trouble is, it’s not always easy to time the stock markets. The good news is that we don’t have to. If I had invested £1,000 anytime in March, on average I’d be sitting on at least 15% capital growth anyway. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…What’s next for the IHG share priceWhile this gives me confidence in the short term, can IHG be a good investment over the long term as well? Its share price chart over the years certainly makes me optimistic. But the hospitality industry has been impacted like never before in the recent past. There hasn’t been a near shutdown in activity before, impacting the top-line hard. This has set back companies’ financials and potentially also altered their plans. Further, the increase in IHG’s share price so far is driven by a relief rally, and not strong performance. Ultimately, how the stock price will behave in the future will depend on the actual pickup in its business. With social distancing measures still in place and business activity back only partially, it’s possible that hospitality will be pick up quite slowly. Bracing for another stock market crashAdditionally, hospitality is a cyclical business. As a result, it’s impacted by the recession, and there’s one underway right now. This means, business travel is likely to remain muted and people are less likely to go on holiday too. If the recession worsens, stocks like IHG will suffer more. The real state of the economy will become clearer in the next months as lockdowns ease further and government support to business reduces. There is increasing speculation of another stock market crash too.With this as the backdrop, it’s hard to tell what’s going to be next for IHG. What we do know is this. The group, whose biggest brand is Holiday Inn Express, can see some easing up in activity as lockdowns end. I’m less sure if business can be sustained and grown thereon. That IHG is a big company, with multiple interests across geographies, gives some confidence. That it has been a financially healthy one is also another positive. The upshotOn balance, there’s still risk to investing in IHG. In the next few months or so, however, the stock price may dip, especially if there’s another stock market crash. And I should be prepared for that, like any good long-term investor. If I’m risk averse, I’d consider safer stocks.last_img read more

Why these 5 FTSE 100 shares are on my 2021 income investing watchlist

first_img Image source: Getty Images Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Why these 5 FTSE 100 shares are on my 2021 income investing watchlist FTSE 100 banking stocks have been among the worst hit from the coronavirus crisis. But I reckon that 2021 is set to bring them cheer. Here are two reasons why that could happen:#1. Green light for dividendsOne of the big blows to FTSE 100 banking stocks came when the Bank of England (BoE) asked them to hold back on dividends. It was of the view that in an uncertain climate, it’s a good idea to maintain banks’ cash buffer. Already impacted by the stock market crash of March, this further exacerbated their share price declines. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…One example is Lloyds Bank, whose share price fell sharply after the announcement. With its indifferent stock price movements, its unique selling point was its hefty dividend yield, which explains investor disappointment. It has started recovering in earnest only since the stock market rally of last month.In good news, however, last week BoE decided to greenlight dividends once again. FTSE 100 banks like Standard Chartered have already indicated that they could initiate dividend payouts by as early as February next year. Similarly, Barclays’ return to profits after a loss last year bodes well. The bank has said that it will make a decision on dividends only in 2021, but its results give hope. HSBC is also contemplating re-starting dividend payouts. #2. Hopes of better economic times2021 also looks better from an economic perspective. Some improvements are already visible, forecasts for UK’s economic growth are positive and, with Covid-19 vaccinations underway, it appears that it will only be a matter of time before we put the pandemic behind us. Banks’ performances are closely linked to the economy. A growing economy demands greater credit and gives banks the flexibility to increase interest rates. As it is, the UK economy has responded to the government’s fiscal stimulus. The stamp duty waiver has been a particular success. Banks like NatWest and Barclays have had to tighten lending conditions to meet the growing demand for home loans as housing demand rises, according to a Financial Times report. This is expected to continue until at least the end of March next year. The downside for FTSE 100 stocksHowever, there’s a downside too. We don’t know how the bad loan situation will turn out. If the economic damage turns out worse than was initially anticipated, banks’ financials could suffer. Or a hard Brexit could be a blow to the economy. And the pandemic really isn’t over until it’s over. Banks could continue to reel under adverse new developments. The takeawayStill, I’d wait and watch for now. First, I’d look out for their dividend payout announcements. I’d also wait for at least one more set of results to see if their performance improves further, especially since we’ve been in a second lockdown recently and restrictions continue. How Brexit plays out is another immediate concern to me. But with an improving outlook and more certainty, I think FTSE 100 banks like Lloyds, HSBC, NatWest, Standard Chartered, and Barclays are worth being on the income investor’s watchlist.  Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Barclays, HSBC Holdings, Lloyds Banking Group, and Standard Chartered. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! Manika Premsingh | Monday, 14th December, 2020 center_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Enter Your Email Address 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. See all posts by Manika Premsingh Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic…And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains.But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times.Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down…You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm.That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away.last_img read more

Preachers ponder their task in divided nation and, perhaps, divided…

first_img ron davin says: Pjcabbiness says: Dan Tootle says: Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags mike geibel says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 18, 2017 at 10:24 am “If people really know that you care about them, they’ll be much more likely to listen to you say things that are challenging,” she said.” That was my experience during 40 years in the pulpit. During the Vietnam War, which I opposed in and out of the pulpit, you could hear cars starting while I was still preaching! It was a congregation with many Navy officers and their families who did not agree with my anti-war stand. However, I would often be told at the church door, “Father Fred, I don’t believe a word of what you are saying, but I know you will take care of my family when I am overseas. That’s what matters to me.” I was always an activist but also a caring pastor. Some of those who opposed my stand on the war took the trouble, years later, to write and say that I had been right, the war was a disaster. April 17, 2017 at 4:07 pm When I was in seminary, we were taught to preach Jesus. Very good advice to today’s clergy who are tempted to stray off message. We are part of the Jesus Movement, which has been effectively going on for over 2,000 years. Most of the 2,000 years was without our preaching. If we preach Jesus, then the Holy Spirit has more room to work in a human heart. When a “preacher” starts down the political road in a sermon, I turn off my ears because I know strife and hurt feelings are just a word away. If we believe Jesus and we preach Jesus all is well with our souls and God’s Holy Spirit can change hearts. Angustia Hamasaki says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL April 17, 2017 at 4:02 pm This is a thoughtful, well written piece, in my opinion. I hope we all can pause for a moment and then reach out to one another to establish a true, respectful dialogue on these difficult and often contentious issues. April 20, 2017 at 10:51 am By the Grace of God. April 17, 2017 at 5:47 pm Those who wish to speak political speech in the pulpit need first to realized they are there through the generosity of the American taxpayer. We don’t pay excessive taxes so churches get by without paying taxes to support the nation, state or county. Preach all the religion you want but don’t cross the line. If you want to do that then start paying the taxes we all have to pay for any business. After all, when you come right down to it, a church is nothing more than a business in vestments.The episcopal church seems to be “hell bent” on causing as much dissent as possible and that church has little desire to bring two differing sides together. You find “them” at the drop of a miter yelling and screaming in the streets. Along with their so-called clergy. Sane and reasonable people don’t take to the streets and disrupt traffic, business, and all commerce in an attempt to force their opinions on others. This clearly obvious move on their part should have shown them this is not the way to effect change. When interviewed on TV most of these protestors can’t answer the simple question, “What are you Protesting?” They don’t have a clue and have nothing more than the desire to join a mob and in many cases they are paid for this. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 17, 2017 at 7:39 pm How did you ever get passed the last 8 years ? Sermons grounded in Scripture, especially the lectionary readings of the day, can be a faith community’s touchstone in times of division, say many preachers.[Episcopal News Service] The 2016 presidential election and the Trump administration have, depending on which pundits you listen to, exposed divides not so keenly seen in the United States since the Civil War or at least since protests wracked the country during the civil rights era and the Vietnam War.People who generally agree with the direction of the current administration frequently encounter others who decry that direction. The relentless pace of the news cycle with its one scandal or debatable decision after another can feel like a bombardment no matter one’s stance.Living a faithful life in the midst of such divisions is not easy. On Sunday morning, members of the same congregation come to church for different reasons. Some might seek respite from the debates raging around the country. Others might be seeking guidance or inspiration for their roles in the public square. Others might be bringing more intimate worries and joys to the nave.  What is a preacher to do?Preachers alone with their Bibles and textbooks have pondered the question and it has been the subject of small clergy gatherings, Facebook discussions and diocesan clergy gatherings, including recently in Maryland and Minnesota.“The gospel is inherently political but not American-partisan political,” says the Rev. Gary Manning, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Gary Manning, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, told Episcopal News Service, that knowing the congregation he faces is filled with all of those sorts of worshippers “tends to help me be a little more gentle,” Gentle, he said, but “not necessarily pulling punches.”Admitting to a tension most preachers feel at one time or another, Manning said, “Quite frankly sometimes I just want to get up and wail away, and I think for whose benefit is that? Is that just because I’ve got the pulpit and I can do that? Well, that’s not what I am called to do; get up and give voice to my own frustration.”The Rev. Bernard J. Owens, rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Greensboro, North Carolina, agreed. “The most pastoral and prophetic thing we can do is speak honestly and truthfully,” he said in an interview with ENS. “And I don’t entirely mean we need to be the prophet Amos every Sunday but rather to be authentic” and grounded in the truth of Scripture.Owens recently tried to debunk the notion that a sermon is “the moment in which a designated holy person tells us everything we need to know.” In “The Light of the World: Writing my first sermon for the age of Trump,” an opinion piece he wrote for the online magazine Slate, Owens wrote that preaching must be rooted in study, prayer and relationships.“A sermon is only one piece of the many-layered, lifelong process of building a community,” he wrote. “Even the most challenging events can also serve as opportunities to strengthen that community, but that requires equal measures of courage and humility.”The Rev. Bernard J. Owens, rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Greensboro, North Carolina, says that simply preaching about discord in politics is not what is called for. Photo courtesy of Bernard J. OwensOwens feels called to “build up a more sacred and loving community that really does include everyone within the congregation.” At the same time, he knows that “if we aren’t honoring that there’s some really upsetting things happening then we’re just ignoring it” and being inauthentic.Yet, it is a balancing act, he said. To preach only about current events can degrade the relationships a preacher has forged in a congregation. It also contributes to the sense of exhaustion many people on both sides of the communion rail feel about keeping track of all the issues and their responses. Moreover, such preaching can simply affirm the fact that people are divided.Besides, Manning said, it can backfire. “I think it’s important to tell the truth but I think it’s important to tell the truth in a way that people can hear it,” he said. “If you just use slogans, if you just use stuff that sounds like you’re recycling some political manifesto, people block up their ears pretty quickly to that.”Manning said it is one thing to show how the gospel critiques the latest political decision or policy. “It’s another thing to ask how are we as gospel people to embody our lives now. How are we to enact gospel witness?”Two preachers who teach the art of homiletics in Episcopal seminaries would agree.In the face of what she called “a huge energy asking us to be reactive,” the Rev. Linda Clader said, “my advice to preachers, and to myself, is to take a big breath and back up a step and really remember that our job is to preach the gospel.”The Rev. Linda Clader, professor emerita of homiletics at Church Divinity School of the Pacific, says preachers needs to be faithful to the day’s readings and the call to build Christian community in the face of a divided culture. Photo: Church Divinity School of the PacificClader, who is professor emerita of homiletics at Church Divinity School of the Pacific, told ENS that preachers must be diligent about starting with the readings for the day. “That doesn’t mean that you aren’t going to respond to something that is crazy enough but our job is to build community, to build a Christian community and it’s a community that’s grounded in the gospel,” she said.However, Clader said, preachers should not fall into the trap of pitting in their sermons what Donald Trump says against what Jesus says. Instead, preachers have to cast a larger vision of “justice, forgiveness and God’s love.”Grounding their sermons in that gospel message gives preachers authority, she said. “That’s the platform of authority that you can stand on because you have studied it and studied it, and you do know something about what it says and what it means,” she said.The Rev. Ruthanna Hooke, associate professor of homiletics at Virginia Theological Seminary, said it is easy for preachers to misuse the pulpit as their personal platforms. “So, Scripture becomes a kind of grounding that you have to keep submitting yourself to – to the claims of the text – so that you are staying in contact with God as the source of preaching.”Clader and Hooke both said that the text, in Hooke’s words, is a crucial touchstone. “But, having said that, the text pushes us into some pretty uncomfortable places,” Hooke added.The difference, in Manning’s words, it that “the gospel is inherently political but not American-partisan political.”Manning said he believes what he is called to do is to remind people that “it is our theology and our baptismal convent that forms our understanding of the world and not the other way around, and that’s hard for people because they’re exposed to the American story all week and maybe the gospel story for an hour.”The gospel, Hooke said, is indeed political in its implications and its applications, and the preacher’s challenge is to explicate it in a way that is “universally hear-able while at the same the time is really the gospel.”The Rev. Ruthanna Hooke, associate professor of homiletics at Virginia Theological Seminary, says Scripture must be the touchstone from which preachers humbly approach their task. Photo: Shawn Evelyn/Virginia Theological SeminaryHooke teaches her students that if they are going to preach a “political sermon,” they “really have to implicate themselves.” Preachers have to ask if they would do what they are asking of their listeners. “That’s an important measure of humility on the part of the preacher and helps with these very divisive questions,” she said, adding that outrage not followed by action does not lend itself to helping the community find solutions.It helps, she said, to remember that any given sermon is part of the preacher’s relationship with the community. “If people really know that you care about them, they’ll be much more likely to listen to you say things that are challenging,” she said.Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton harkened to that care in a February pastoral letter. He urged preachers, among other things, to witness to the gospel and acknowledge that there are other witnesses. Remind your listeners, he said, that you want to keep talking with them, and then show a willingness to listen, change your mind and repent if needed.“Show some courage,” Sutton said. “It’s easier in the long run for your pastoral ministry than cowardice.”The bishop asked listeners to show the same willingness to listen, change one’s mind and repent, but also to study the Sunday readings and acknowledge Jesus as “both a spiritual and a political teacher.”“Cut your preachers some slack,” Sutton said. “They really are trying to say and do the right thing.”And, Manning noted, they are doing it during the 12 or so minutes that most Episcopal preachers devote to the sermon.Hooke reminded preachers that the pulpit might not always be the best place from which to dive deeply into the issues of the day because the sermon is a monologue, not truly a conversation. It might be better, she said, to open up an issue while preaching and then host conversations at other times. The church, Manning and Hooke said, can be hospitable to difficult conversations among people with opposing viewpoints. Churches might be becoming one of the few places where non-like-minded people can gather for conversation, Hooke said.Being Christian in times like these means finding common ground and core values, says Presiding Bishop Michael Curry. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceWhether it is in the pulpit or during an adult education forum, the first step ought to be acknowledging that the divisions in the wider world exist within in a congregation. “It can be pastorally helpful to actually talk about something that everybody’s thinking about but afraid to voice,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry said during a recent news conference when a reporter asked him about the challenges of preaching to and leading congregations during this season of division.The next question, Curry said, is “how do you move forward and offer a word and help people navigate a context that is complex – morally complex?”As a parish priest and then as bishop of North Carolina, Curry said, he learned that calling people to stand on common ground helped give everyone some navigational tools.“I approached that by trying to first attempt to identify and articulate what are the core values reflected in the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, that we as followers of Jesus, as Christians, believe,” he said.“Claiming the space of the values and teachings of Jesus does not mean that we have all the answers to how to solve either the problem or the issue,” he warned. Rather, it means claiming the common ground at least for Christians and looking for people of other religious traditions and people with no religious traditions who nevertheless hold the same values.That approach allows for the fact that “everybody’s got something to contribute and we’ll come out with something better when we do that.”Curry gave some examples. How, he asked, might a study of the parable of the Good Samaritan inform the health-care debate? Christians know of Jesus’ so-called Golden Rule in Matthew 7:12 in which he tells his followers to do to others as they would have others do to them. “Now, if you are a legislator, you have to ask yourself the social policy question of is this decision something I would want somebody else to do to me,” Curry said.“To love your neighbor as yourself means not only to love the person whom the legislation was trying to help but it’s also about loving the person who disagrees with you,” he said. Republicans and Democrats must see each as neighbors, as defined by Jesus, “if you want to be a Christian,” he said.“The truth is we are not the Republican Party at prayer and we are not the Democratic Party at prayer,” Curry said. “We are the Jesus Movement and that makes a difference.”(Episcopalians can engage in policy discussions and advocacy at the federal level, and in some cases state level, by joining the Episcopal Public Policy Network.)– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is Episcopal News Service’s senior reporter/editor. The Rev. Gwin Hanahan says: Robert Browning says: Submit a Job Listing Comments (26) By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 17, 2017 Rector Belleville, IL April 18, 2017 at 10:21 am I am delighted to read your comments. While I thought this article was well written and well balanced, I have lately come to believe that I am the only Episcopalian conservative in the pews, and the only lawyer that supports President Trump. (I fully acknowledge that he and his administration have rough edges, but judging from the knee-jerk reactions I regularly hear from my more liberal colleagues and fellow parishioners, let alone some of the sermons I have heard since last November, I had begun to despair that in contemporary Episcopal interpretation of my Baptismal vow, being a Christian and a member of the Body of Christ necessarily means being socially liberal in civil politics.) To be sure, my faith informs my politics, and I am quick to criticize the President or any other Republican or any other conservative if his position is antithetical to my understanding of the Gospel; and I would want any preacher to explain why any government action is or is not consistent with Jesus’s teaching. But I am glad to understand, from what you say here, that there still is diversity of political opinion in our church. Thank you! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Jess Jaffe says: Submit a Press Release The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York F William Thewalt says: Featured Events Bill Louis says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Pjcabbiness says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC mike geibel says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA April 18, 2017 at 11:01 am Thank-you for this very relevant article. I am studying to be a Lay Preacher in the Diocese of Central New York and have too felt the pull between my personal convictions overshadowing my sermons. As preachers, we dive into scripture with our whole being, hoping that when we emerge, the Holy Spirit has given us the best exegesis of the reading possible. And that’s the point. The scriptures don’t require anything other than themselves to be revealed. They have stood on their own for 2000 years. The Word will, and has survived the best of times and the worst of times. Remember the two disciples on the road home to Emmaus on Resurrection Day? They heard the words spoken by the, “stranger,” and their, “hearts stirred.” May our words, preached at the pulpit, in sync with the Holy Spirit, stir hearts and transform lives. God is still God; and God changes hearts for God’s purpose no matter which side of of the political spectrum we find ourselves. And that is all good. Peace to All Featured Jobs & Calls Warren Eckels says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 18, 2017 at 2:16 am Actually, sometimes obeying God, loving God with heart, mind and soul and loving your neighbor as yourself means putting yourself in opposition to injustice. If we allow ourselves to be vexed by wrath, to be first to judge and condemn, to hold ourselves inherently better than our political opponents, then even if we triumph politically, the triumph will be hollow and simply plant the seeds for the next Trump. Joseph Pagano says: April 30, 2017 at 11:36 am Nowhere in the article did I hear the very large truth, We need the Trumpers’ pledge dollars. I would have a whole lot more respect for this branch of the Church if I saw an acknowledgement of this fact of life. As for the many, many people in the church who feel as I do, that this is not rocket science; when you re trying to throw 24 million off healthcare, when you empower a police force to rip people from their beds and their schools, when you label the free press an enemy and make statements not based in fact or reality, when you try to destroy many departments of government you have been entrusted to uphold, when you fuel and stoke the flames of white supremacy — this is Evil. To those clear-sighted people, I ask a question, if your national leadership refuses to call out Evil, are you not being “complicit” giving your time treasure and talents to something that tries to swing both ways? Yes, there are Blue State dioceses that have called out Trump, but from the Red States, the silence has been deafening — just as with the national leadership. Do you really want to be a support to such a group? I personally voted with my feet. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 1, 2017 at 1:27 pm Mr. Eckels, You obviously did not get the message being presented by Bishop Curry… By using a phrase such as, …”simply plant the seeds for the next Trump.”, you alienate any Trump supporters that are reading your message and set up conflict that leads to hurt feelings and discord.“Republicans and Democrats must see each as neighbors, as defined by Jesus, “if you want to be a Christian,… The truth is we are not the Republican Party at prayer and we are not the Democratic Party at prayer,” Curry said. “We are the Jesus Movement and that makes a difference.” May 6, 2017 at 8:38 am Finally, we have someone willing to stand up against evil and walk out of the EC for its hypocrisy in accepting pledge money from Trump supporters. I think you should persuade all your friends who think just like you do to follow your lead and vow never to return until every Episcopal Church adopts a “zero tolerance” policy against anyone who refuses to pledge allegiance to “resistance” rather than to “peace” and reconciliation. To regain its soul, the TEC must publically denounce Trump and stop accepting this tainted blood money from Trump supporters and expel them from the pews. After all, this is war—the evil empire verses the dark side. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska April 19, 2017 at 11:47 am I meant to add that I am a Korean war vet, went back to university with Gi Bill and went to Nashotah House Seminary because in between High school, 4 yrs. military and during college years I apprenticed as a carpenter/builder. My bishop, Hart, Diocese of PA, even though Diocese was historically “Low Church”, as Pres. of CPF, he was able to get me into Nashotah, if I could finish building needed 25 student housing units. Which I did. There I served as Deputy Sheriff, carpenter and other construction during those 3 years. I then rebuilt a parish in down trodden section of Phila. I then built a parish in Florida staying there over 30 years. I am a life long conservative Republican, BUT I vote on issues and what I believe in the candidate. I try to separate people and issues into: CAN’T and WON’T. The Can’t’s I help with all my being. It is tough to sometimes distinguish. I am an optimist and Hope springs eternal.Bless us all as we believe that church is a hospital for sinners and not a museum for saints. Evangelism is: one Beggar telling another Beggar where the BREAD is! Come to the Table! Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC April 19, 2017 at 12:47 pm Mike Geibel makes many excellent points with which I am in full agreement. If the Episcopal Church is not yet in my own “rear-view mirror” it is simply because I do not like the idea of being driven out of the church by the growing mob of left-wing dissenters and their increasingly bizarre views. Of the many increasingly acceptable opinions within the Episcopal Church, perhaps the most grotesque is the notion that so-called transgendered people should have the right to “change” themselves even to the point of mutilating their own bodies. What this amounts to is telling our divine creator that he made some kind of a “gender assignment” mistake which we human beings have a (God-given?) right to correct. Surely this amounts to plain lunacy and I feel sympathy for those priests and bishops who remain loyal to historic religious common sense but are forced to get along with those of their non-traditionalist brethren who in reality are the true dissenters. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Kilty Maoris says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ April 19, 2017 at 6:24 am The whole discussion is confused. To articulate a coherent position one would need to (at a minimum) answer the following questions:1. What do you mean by politics? Are you drawing on a tradition of political discourse that flows from Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rouseau, Habermas or some other political theorist?2. What do you mean when you say “Jesus was political?” How so? In what ways? Is there a political theory to be found in the Gospels? Or are you teasing out hints and tendencies?3. Which “Jesus” are you referring to? The so-called historical Jesus? If so, then you have to engage all the questions that go into that contested area of discourse? If not, is it the Jesus we meet in Matthew’s version of the Sermon on the Mount? In the final form of Mark? Luke? John?4. What is a sermon? What is the meaning and purpose of a sermon in the context of worship?One can answer these questions in a variety of ways (there are volumes written on these subjects), but one needs to answer them. Without answers to these questions the discussion is confused and the assertions made by the participants lack clarity and coherence. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Preachers ponder their task in divided nation and, perhaps, divided congregations Scripture, relationships and common ground seen as sermons’ anchors Gretchen Lipp says: April 18, 2017 at 11:31 am Entering most Episcopal Churches, one is aware most keenly that the center of our worship is the altar, not the pulpit. Seven to twelve minute-sermons come from prayer, attention to the Holy Spirit, study, and they shed light on the day’s Readings, most often the Gospel. Condensing many hours of preparation into those 7-12 minutes is a discipline that provides the hearers with an historical, literary, etc. criticism in a space so that the hearers may be informed by the Holy Spirit, not by a preacher’s opinion. Preach Jesus; let the Spirit work; respect the parishioners’ ability to think within the via media. Allow space in our sermons for all of this to happen. Trust God who gave us all intelligence. All of this in 7-12 minutes. Then comes the central part of our service, the center of our worship: not the pulpit and the priest but God’s Table and the Holy Spirit. Tony Oberdorfer says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 18, 2017 at 4:33 am Different people have different ideas of what it means to act in a Christian way. the members of my parish tend toward the conservative, though we have many liberals. We are a parish that has a tradition of doing. We sponsor a youth center with after school programs in a low income city a few miles from our church, a well child clinic, three sober living houses for recovering addicts and a food bank among other ministries. We are also gone to an Asian Outreach ministry and a prison ministry. I am told the more liberal parish has lots of committees that write letters. We have had stormy controversies but it is by emphasizing what we have inCommon that we have survived. The evil of going down the political road is this: we begin to see each other as Republicans or Democrats rather than as Christians. Shortly after the election one of our deacons preached a very political sermon in which she implied, To a parish full of people who voted for Trump, that people who voted for Trump posed an actual physical danger to those right minded people who didn’t. She was actually shocked to learn that she had offended people who came to church regularly, who participated in and donated to the ministries we have to the poor, who had always been kind and generous to her. I was one of those offended. The problem is that, as others have observed, we conservatives tend to think that liberals are mistaken and misguided. Too many liberals think that conservatives are just evil and selfish and full of hate. It’s hard to have a meaningful dialog when the other side thinks you are evil. And, as a lawyer, I know full well that Justice is too often in the eye of the beholder. There are at least two sides to every contentious issue. You may think the U S was evil in dropping the atomic bomb. Those of your parishioners who were once soldiers who were being shipped to the Pacific for the invasion of Japan, and their descendants may beg to differ. They are alive today because that bomb was dropped. At least that’s how they see it. In fact that exact scenario happened in my parish when our then priest had the custom of preaching against the atom bomb every August. He stopped after I pointed out how many of his parishioners had served in WWII or were the children or grandchildren of those who did. I have already made this comment too long but that’s really the point. These are complex issues that don’t lend themselves to 12 minute sermons This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 17, 2017 at 8:38 pm There are at least 2 kinds of churches. Pulpit centered and Altar centered. Pulpit centered, you come to hear what preacher has to say. If it is not what you anticipate or buy into, you may go away with less than you came with.In Altar centered church you come to offer up all your sins and the preacher is one of the ones there to do the same, along with usher, acolyte, Lay Reader, etc.At birth we are like a tabla rossa with a clean slate. Our sins get tacked up onto this. We put these sins and thumb tacks into the offering plate and Confession. Thumb tack holes remain. Holy Communion fills up the holes on our tabla rossa and we again are off to a new start – Go Forth!You are part of the Body of Christ; not the leader of a Bible Study or politician running for office. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 20, 2017 at 1:17 pm I have no training in political science, and I am not a Biblical scholar, but I am not persuaded that Jesus was political. Others more qualified say Jesus was political, and probably they know better than I do, but I wonder if they say this merely to justify their political activism as “God’s work.” I do, however, believe that the execution of Jesus Christ by the Roman state was politically motivated. I also attribute the demise of the Episcopal Church to its political activism, at least in part. The difference is that the demise of the Church is largely self-inflicted. My exit from the Church is of no consequence. I read an article on the declining membership of the TEC which commented that liberal-minded millennials are not flocking to the Episcopal Church as predicted by the former Bishop, and that most of the members still attending services are “geezers” like myself who do so “out of habit” and a desire to preserve their funeral in the church of their birth. We “geezers” are hardly a reliable stream of revenue into the future, and political activism is a thirsty beast. Rumors that the TEC and ACLU are engaged in merger negotiations are sarcastic punch-lines by those who are angry and gloat over the continuing nose-dive in membership, but concerns of fiscal sustainability are a reality and seem to be forcing a shift from “ministry” for an aging membership, to sales of church property and investments in business ventures. The ENS published trial reports of Bishop Bruno closing St. James in Newport Beach so he could sell the sanctuary for $15 million to a real estate developer to pay legal fees and invest the money in revenue producing property. The ashes of former members interned at the church would be respectfully relocated. The LA Diocese has declared itself a “sanctuary diocese” and approved a budget that includes $1.5 million for immigrants and refugees, this at the same time that the loyal members were locked out of the sanctuary at St. James so it could be destroyed and replaced with luxury condominiums. It is ironic that many of the Churches owned by the diocese are similarly located on very valuable property and could be quickly converted to cash under Trump’s agenda designed to spur private development. With the current political vitriol spewed nightly by media hacks (on both sides) and the controversial and divisive actions advocated by the Leadership, local pastors who are honestly and faithfully trying to “Preach the Word” as engraved on the pulpit featured below the title of the article are faced with a difficult task. April 18, 2017 at 5:04 am Thanks be to God, that I’m Christian Episcopalian hope worthy to be called Christian. God bless us all. Don’t look to our sins Lord but your love and mercy to help us grow with humility, goodness, kindness as worthy servants and children of yours, that we may all respect all your creations. Through Jesus our loving savior name we pray. Amen Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN April 18, 2017 at 5:07 pm A thoughtful article on the predicament now facing pastors—but I get the impression that the real question the article tries to address, is: “How to give a sermon denouncing Trump without offending and losing conservative parishioners.” My advice is: Don’t do it. Joining the chorus of nightly media pundits who hate Trump more than they love America will alienate those members who disagree with you. I agree with the comments of Robert Browning and Rev. Hanahan distinguishing between a “pulpit” and an “altar” church. Ministering to the spiritual needs of church members in their daily lives is a full time job without the politics. I don’t go to Church to hear a lecture on some controversial issue or to listen to others engage in political debates. I seek guidance on how I should live my life and be a better person, and not on who or what I should vote for. The implicit message of any sermon advocating a political position or indirectly endorsing a political candidate is that if you don’t agree with the pastor, “you are a bad person.”I doubt the theories offered on the “art” of giving homilies with political messages will actually work in practice. Parishioners are not stupid. They will recognize a political message advocating universal health care even if disguised as the story of the Good Samaritan. And the story doesn’t answer the question: “How much does it cost and who is going to pay for it?”Missing from the article are interviews with pastors who have personally witnessed the resulting friction between members, empty pews, and declining pledge monies. Also missing from the article is an honest disclosure of the negative statistical and fiscal impact of Episcopal political activism following the election of President Trump. I therefore find the comments posted by actual front-line pastors to be more persuasive. I left the Episcopal Church because of the political posturing by the Leadership and not because of my Pastor— we may have disagreed on politics but I respected her as a compassionate and spiritual leader. The ENS has published many post-election articles on bishops signing opposition statements to Executive Orders, amicus curie legal briefs on transgender rights, declarations of a sanctuary diocese, and participation in protest marches on everything from oil pipelines to abortion rights. I wish the article had disclosed the number of pastors who have reported loss of members, declining attendance and that their church must largely pay its mission share not from pledges, but by renting church property to private businesses and holding fundraisers open to non-members. Examples of real life consequences are a better measure of what not to do than rhetorical theory. My perception is that the leadership has aligned itself with the same politics that have eliminated God from school, and members of the clergy have walked arm in arm with anarchists advocating violence and atheist college professors who indoctrinate students on political correctness, label those who disagree as deplorable, hillbilly racists, decry capitalism as evil, and consider Jesus Christ to be a fairy tale for the weak-minded. For me, the Church leadership has made the term “Jesus Movement” a synonym for activist preachers advocating leftist ideology.There are many members who are quite orthodox in their Christian faith, who are fiscally conservative, who respect our Nation’s laws, and yet support some (but not all) liberal causes. I was such a cradle Episcopalian. The Episcopal Church is now in my rear-view mirror. April 17, 2017 at 5:24 pm Then you are ignoring the Jesus who spoke and acted against the political and religious authorities of his time (and who also subsequently killed him). To preach Jesus is not just to love your God with all your heart, mind, and soul and to love your neighbor as you love yourself. It is also the recognize, speak against, and to act to eliminate injustice. Your comment alludes to such action as being “political”. What it is is to preach Jesus as a matter of speaking truth to power, no matter whether that applies to political or religious power. Ted Foley says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: April 19, 2017 at 12:02 pm I picked up this article a few days late. I found the tone of the comments to be very telling.I wonder if it would be helpful, in any discussion such as this, to avoid labels such as “conservative”, or “liberal” or the many other labels used to sub-divide us? Quite frankly, I sometimes wonder if we all mean the same thing when we are using the same labels.Would it be helpful instead to talk about specific issues and look at them through the lens of scripture? Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Faith & Politics Rector Collierville, TN James Saunders says: April 20, 2017 at 12:37 pm If you don’t like what’s going on with your church then stop putting your contributions into the general fund. The diocese feeds off every church under its jurisdiction with what is called an accessment. Choke off the dollars that flow to up them and they will start to listen. Give your donations to local outreach or a designated fund that improves your church building. Get creative but keep it out of the General fund. It’s not an easy thing to do. When your church leadership discovers what you are trying to do you will get some diapproving looks and plenty of pushback depending where they stand with the issues you don’t agree with. For a real view of what is going on with the higher Episcopal Church search out the last budget approved by the convention. April 18, 2017 at 8:41 pm I thought that I was possibly the last conservative Episcopalian. I am pleased to see that there are others. I will not give up on the Episcopal Church. I guess I am either a glutton for punishment or a modern day Don Quixote type. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Paul A Fessenden says: Susan Salisbury says: Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. April 18, 2017 at 3:41 pm James Saunders speaks well for the many of us Episcopalians of long standing who feel marginalized by the “contemporary Episcopalian interpretation of Baptismal vows.” I am not a pariah because I voted against Hillary Clinton. What ever happened to the third leg of the Episcopal stool called “reason?” Reason is the last thing on the mind of those who self-assuredly “know” they are right. Sermons with a good dose of reason are always well received. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Robert Browning says: mike geibel says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Dolls House / Edwards Moore

first_imgphotographs:  Frasen MarsdenPhotographs:  Frasen Marsden+ 27 Share Dolls House / Edwards MooreSave this projectSaveDolls House / Edwards MooreSave this picture!© Frasen MarsdenHouses•Melbourne, Australia Houses Australia Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/400058/dolls-house-edwards-moore Clipboard Year:  Year:  “COPY” Architects: Edwards Moore Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/400058/dolls-house-edwards-moore Clipboard 2013 Photographs CopyAbout this officeEdwards MooreOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMelbourneHousesAustraliaPublished on July 16, 2013Cite: “Dolls House / Edwards Moore” 16 Jul 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Surface: Nordic DécorGlassMitrexSolar PanelsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemSealantsAGROB BUCHTALHow To Benefit From Ceramic Tiles With Hytect SurfaceSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassFacade SystemsTrimoTrimoterm FTV in the BASE – Backing wallSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylight Ridgelight in Office BuildingDoorsVEKAFront Doors – SOFTLINECurtain WallsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Curtain Wall – Rabel 35000 Slim Super ThermalResidential ApplicationsULMA Architectural SolutionsVentilated Facades on Building in PamplonaDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewAccessories / TV MountsYellow Goat DesignScreens – BlossomMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Dolls House / Edwards Moore ArchDaily 2013 CopySave this picture!© Frasen MarsdenRecommended ProductsMetallicsSculptformClick-on Battens in Ivanhoe ApartmentsCeramicsApavisaTiles – JewelsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreCeramicsApariciPorcelain Tiles – TangoText description provided by the architects. The smallest house on the street, renovation of a workers cottage in Fitzroy Retaining the existing street frontage and primary living areas whilst fragmenting the building addition beyond. Creating courtyards which serve to separate yet connect the functions for living. A collection of raw and untreated finishes creating a grit that compliments the owners desire for an uncomplicated living arrangement. Save this picture!© Frasen MarsdenEchoes of the homes history are reflected in discreetly choreographed gold panels located throughout the space.  An abundance of natural light refracting off the all white interiors create a sense of the ethereal, an otherworldly environment hidden amongst the urban grain.Save this picture!Floor PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessMalecon Castilla House / David Mutal ArquitectosSelected ProjectsMayor of London Suggests Three Potential Sites for Major AirportArchitecture News Share “COPY”last_img read more

The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi Architect

first_imgArchDaily Projects Area:  2000 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Doublespace Photography Engineer:Andrea Don, caster EngineeringStructural Model:Ben AngusContractor:Joseph ‘MacGee’ MacFarlaneArchitects In Charge:Omar Gandhi, Jeff Shaw, Peter Kolodziej, Amber KilbornCity:Inverness CountyCountry:CanadaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyRecommended ProductsDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewWoodEGGERLaminatesEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreText description provided by the architects. The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh is situated delicately along a narrow piece of land between a tree-lined country road and a dramatic ocean-side cliff. The project is located on Broad Cove Marsh Road on the outskirts of Inverness, Cape Breton Island, a small coastal community popular among tourists and seasonal dwellers for to its sandy beaches and dunes, steep cliffs along the Cabot Trail, and world-class golf courses. Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyThe clients —a married couple from Toronto, and proud parents of three grown-up kids—purchased the long sliver of coastline for its expansive sunset views over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, its adjacency to the serene fairways and jagged cliffs of the Cabot Cliffs golf course, and to build a place to bring family together.Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyThe seasonal residence is defined by a single loaded corridor running parallel to the length of the property, with a series of open and private spaces overlooking the ocean cliff. Save this picture!AxonometricSave this picture!PlansThe corridor is anchored by an exposed concrete retaining wall on the exterior wall and a 48-foot continuous run of board-clad millwork, which slips seamlessly from exterior to interior and then continues again on the far side of the residence. Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyProgrammatically, one half of the dwelling is composed of an indoor/outdoor great room that includes areas for relaxing, cooking, and hosting. This open space is anchored by an 18-foot long island which shares food prep and dining. Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyOn the other end of the house, three repeating pod-like units slip past the ocean-side glazing to plug into the corridor, and thereby delineate the private spaces of bedrooms and bathrooms. In contrast to the concrete finish of the groundwork (retaining wall and floor slab) and the fine-grain natural finish of the wooden service bars, the pods are lined with white-washed locally sourced spruce boards of a wider dimensions. Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyThe south-west face of the dwelling (private side) opens to the views of the Atlantic with floor-to-ceiling glass, while the long strip of clerestory sitting atop the retaining wall (public side) allows a continuous run of gentle north-east light to peer in. A simple, reverse-shed roof floats the length of the building like a low-slung hat, shielding the interiors from the more intense summer sun while exaggerating the horizontality of the sea and landscape. Atop the kitchen, a portion of the roof lifts up like an open cassette deck to allow more light to trickle in—moderated a low-tech wood brise-soleil—and to punctuate the heart of the social space Save this picture!© Doublespace PhotographyProject gallerySee allShow lessAlison Brooks Architects Designs First London Highrise for Greenwich Peninsula Devel…Architecture NewsThe Iconic Awards 2017 is Now Open for SubmissionsIdeas Share 2015 “COPY” CopyHouses•Inverness County, Canada Save this picture!© Doublespace Photography+ 13 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/867134/the-lookout-at-broad-cove-marsh-omar-gandhi-architect Clipboard “COPY” Canada The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi Architect The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi ArchitectSave this projectSaveThe Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi Architect Year:  Photographs Houses ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/867134/the-lookout-at-broad-cove-marsh-omar-gandhi-architect Clipboard Architects: Omar Gandhi Architect Area Area of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeOmar Gandhi ArchitectOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesInverness CountyCanadaPublished on March 14, 2017Cite: “The Lookout at Broad Cove Marsh / Omar Gandhi Architect” 14 Mar 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abrasion ResistantPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceCarpetsB&B ItaliaCarpet – TwistBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersMembranesEffisusHow to use Fire Protection MembranesSoftware / CoursesSculptformSpecification Tool – Price and Spec AppFittingsHOPPEFloor Spring – AR2950DoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodViroc Nature for False Ceilings and FlooringFiber Cements / CementsDuctal®Textured PanelAcousticConwedAcoustic Panels – Eurospan®More products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?宽阔的湾湿地的瞭望台 / Omar Gandhi Architect是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Scott Robinson to Lead Toshiba’s Managed Print Services

first_imgLocal News Twitter TAGS  Twitter Facebook Scott Robinson to Lead Toshiba’s Managed Print Services By Digital AIM Web Support – March 19, 2021 Previous articleOAT021521_winter_wildart_43Next articleGobert, Jazz beat Bucks 129-115 for 6th straight win Digital AIM Web Supportcenter_img Pinterest WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook Scott Robinson to Lead Toshiba’s Managed Print Services Pinterestlast_img read more

Donegal North-East Deputy Joe McHugh defends household charge

first_img NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Donegal North-East Deputy Joe McHugh defends household charge Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH WhatsApp Donegal North-East Deputy, Joe McHughs defending the impending 100 euro household charge, saying it amounts to just 2 euro per week, which will go towards funding vital local authority services.The issue led to heated Dáil exchanges earlier,  after it emerged those who don’t pay will face a fine of 2,500 euro.It follows calls from Donegal Deputy Thomas Pringle for people to support a campaign not to pay the new €100 Household Charge or any charges for septic tanks either.Deputy Joe McHugh says Deputy Pringle is taking the populist approach.He says there’s no turning back on this charge, but the Government will have to look at a sensible way of bringing in the charge, and they must ensure that they don’t introduce flat charges for every household.Deputy McHugh also said that the charge will have to go toward local authority services…[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/joem530.mp3[/podcast] Google+ By News Highland – December 14, 2011 Facebookcenter_img Twitter Google+ News Previous articleEircom to brief Letterkenny Council on future plans for the town in JanuaryNext article41-year-old man appears in Court in Derry charged with terrorism offences News Highland Pinterest Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this weeklast_img read more

Centre Extends Validity Of Driving Licences, Registrations, Fitness Certificates & Permits That Expired Since Feb 1 Till Dec 31 [Read Advisory]

first_imgNews UpdatesCentre Extends Validity Of Driving Licences, Registrations, Fitness Certificates & Permits That Expired Since Feb 1 Till Dec 31 [Read Advisory] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK24 Aug 2020 10:15 PMShare This – xThe Ministry of Road Transport and Highways has extended the validity of documents like driving licenses, permits and registration that expired since February 1. In an advisory to all states and Union Territories, the Ministry has asked them to treat such documents as valid till December 31, 2020. The documents include Fitness certificates, Permit (all types), Driving License,…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Ministry of Road Transport and Highways has extended the validity of documents like driving licenses, permits and registration that expired since February 1. In an advisory to all states and Union Territories, the Ministry has asked them to treat such documents as valid till December 31, 2020. The documents include Fitness certificates, Permit (all types), Driving License, Registration or any other document under the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 and Central Motor Vehicles Rules, 1989. The decision has been taken in consideration of the “grim situation” continuing due to conditions for prevention of spread of COVID-19 across the country. An advisory issued in this behalf by the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways states, “Taking into consideration the grim situation still continuing due to conditions for prevention of spread of COVID-19 across the country, it is advised that the validity of all the of the above referred Documents whose extension of validity could not or not likely be granted due to lockdown and which had expired since 1st of Feb, 2020 or would expire by 31st Dec 2020, the same may be treated to be valid till 31st of December 2020. Enforcement authorities are advised to treat such documents valid till 31st of December 2020. This will help out the citizens in availing transport related services.” The Government has asked all the states and UTs to implement the advisory in letter and spirit, so that transporters who are rendering essential services are not harassed unnecessarily. The Ministry had earlier issued advisories on 30th March and 9th June this year regarding extension of validity of the said documents till September 30, 2020. Click Here To Download Advisory Next Storylast_img read more