Telkom books 3.5 percent profit growth in 2019 as demand for internet services rises

first_imgStocks of Telkom, traded at Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) under the code (TLKM), were down 2.77 percent at 2:04 p.m. on Wednesday while the exchange’s main gauge, the Jakarta Composite Index (JCI), was only down a marginal 0.04 percent. The stocks have fallen more than 13 percent over the past year, Bloomberg data show.Read also: State firms to focus on ‘slimming down’ while avoiding layoffsThe company recorded 3.7 percent annual growth in its revenue to Rp 135.57 trillion last year, while its expenses fell by 1.2 percent to Rp 70,73 trillion.Despite posting profit growth over the full year, the company’s net profit in the fourth quarter dropped by 42 percent year-on-year (yoy) to Rp 2.2 trillion and came in below the market’s consensus expectation, according to brokerage company Mirae Asset Sekuritas Indonesia. Publicly listed state telecommunication giant PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia (Telkom) booked Rp 18.66 trillion (US$1.11 billion) profit in 2019, a 3.5 percent rise from the preceding year, as the company’s mobile and internet services businesses were on the rise.Telkom’s cellular operator subsidiary Telkomsel saw its digital business earning jump by 23.1 percent to Rp 58.24 trillion as mobile data consumption grows, while Telkom’s home internet provider arm IndiHome also recorded a 28.1 percent increase in its earning to Rp18.3 trillion last year.“Our achievement in 2019 reflects that Telkom is on the right path in becoming a digital telecommunication company,” Telkom president director Ririek Adriansyah said in a statement on Tuesday. “Despite mild top-line growth in the fourth quarter of 2019, we saw decreased earnings largely due to the combination of impairment loss on investment asset and higher operations and maintenance expenses,” read the research note issued Tuesday.“We think operational performance should be in line with our estimates regarding flat subscriber growth and data yield, exponential growth in data traffic with rising data consumption per subscriber, declining use of legacy services and so forth,” it added.Telkom spent Rp 36.59 trillion, or around 27 percent of 2019 revenue, to improve its digital services capability by procuring broadband infrastructure, such as 4G LTE base transceiver stations (BTS) and undersea internet fiber-optic cables, among other things.Read also: Telkom to invest around Rp 1 trillion in cloud data centers next yearThe company expects data traffic to continue to grow significantly, in line with the expansion of digital services, such as games, video, advertising and payments, which are still in the early growth phases.Mobile data consumption in Indonesia stands at 5.2 gigabyte (GB) on average per month per customer, which compares to 13 GB in Thailand and 11 GB in India, according to Telkom.Telkom’s enterprise segment, which includes data center and cloud services, booked Rp 18.7 trillion in revenue and thereby contributed around 14 percent to the telecom giant’s total revenue, according to the company’s statement.“Telkom has been striving to develop various digital services that are based on smart platforms, such as cloud, big data and the internet of things (IoT), to match the customers’ needs,” Ririek said.“We believe our digital business division will become a growth booster for Telkom in the future,” he added.Telkom announced earlier this year that the company would transform its business strategy to focus more on digital services, following criticism from State-Owned Enterprises Minister Eric Thohir in February toward the company’s overreliance on Telkomsel, which contributes 70 percent to its income.Read also: Telkom comes up with new expansion plan … after ministerial reprimandTelkom should focus more on big data and cloud computing, Erick said, and he expected Telkom’s cloud services to be on a par with the more established services in other countries, like China’s Alibaba Cloud.Ririek later said the company was transforming its services from off-the-shelf products to solution-based software.“We will enter what we call the digital platform, for example the data center and then the cloud. Because looking ahead, [the future] of computing is the cloud,” he said during a business forum in February.Topics :last_img read more

Dental Marathon to take on Mount Kilimanjaro for free oral healthcare

first_imgThe Dental Marathon team will set off in June to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa. The goal is to help get free oral healthcare and education to African children.Play Your Part ambassador Thobile Mushwana wants to change the narrative that there are more smart phones than toothbrushes in Africa. He is the founder of the Dental Marathon. (Images: Dental Marathon, Facebook)Melissa JavanPlay Your Part ambassador Thobile Mushwana says he has always had the desire to make a long-term impact on society that will leave a lasting legacy. The founder of the Dental Marathon makes sure that all schoolchildren in the Free State learn about oral health.The Dental Marathon team gives lessons in oral health to schoolchildren; each child in the more than 800 schools also gets a free dental pack that includes a toothbrush and toothpaste.Play Your Part ambassadors promote active citizenship to help overcome South Africa’s challenges.“There are painful stories. It baffles me when I hear that an eight- or nine-year-old has never brushed their teeth,” says Mushwana, who comes from Limpopo. He’s been living in Bloemfontein for eight years. “There is a lot to be done, not just in South Africa but throughout Africa.”To make sure more children get free oral healthcare and education, the Dental Marathon plans to summit Mount Kilimanjaro in June 2017.More than 180,000 schoolchildren benefit from the Dental Marathon initiative in Bloemfontein.Mushwana is the founder and chief executive officer of the Dental Marathon. He says he wants to change the narrative that there are more smart phones than toothbrushes in Africa.This is why the Dental Marathon is establishing a global footprint. To build awareness, Mushwana recorded videos of people all over the world saying they supported the Dental Marathon. He started this #50Different campaign during a visit in Europe.In the videos, people first introduce themselves in their native language; each ends their video saying they support the Dental Marathon. In his video, Mushwana spoke in his native language, Xitsonga. He said: “Avuxeni, vito ra mina hi mina Thobile Mushwana. Ni huma Africa-dzonga ni seketela Dental Marathon.” (In English this means “hi, I’m Thobile Mushwana from South Africa and I support the Dental Marathon.”)The videos are uploaded onto the group’s Facebook page.Watch #50Different campaign videos:How the Dental Marathon worksOnce a week the Dental Marathon team visits a school in Bloemfontein, explains Mushwana. “During the week we do an analysis of the needs of the school we are going to on that particular Friday.”The programme runs throughout the year. On the school visits, the team teaches the children what healthy foods you should eat, how to keep your teeth clean and how to floss.Thereafter, the children leave their toothbrushes at school. In the morning before class starts, the teachers make sure they brush their teeth.Climbing Mount KilimanjaroMushwana says the team will leave Johannesburg for Tanzania on 3 June 2017. He and others will climb Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, to raise funds.Kili, as it is affectionately known, rises about 4,900 metres from its base to 5,895 metres above sea level.The group aims to raise R10-million to build a Dental Marathon House in Bloemfontein.“Before we leave for Tanzania, we will have a press conference to show what the Dental Marathon House will look like,” says Mushwana.The Dental Marathon HouseAt the Dental Marathon House, children will get free oral healthcare and education, such as free check-ups, explains Mushwana.“We are going to open a head office in Johannesburg. The Dental Marathon House will be established in Bloemfontein.”In addition, the group plans to set up two mobile clinics that will travel throughout South Africa. “We will set up the first mobile clinic with a truck, which will have two dental chairs at the back.”One such mobile clinic will cost R2.2-million.Setting up a global footprintFollowing the Dental Marathon House in Bloemfontein, the organisation wants to establish a Dental Marathon House in Limpopo and the Eastern Cape. Once these are complete, the Dental Marathon team has their eye on building houses across the continent.Anyone can partner with the organisation. “We’re not looking for hand outs. We’re looking for a hand to partner with,” says Mushwana. “This brand will continue to grow.”Mushwana says Africa needs more problem solvers. “Most challenges are going to be solved by young people… Within each of us we have the solutions.”The Dental Marathon team consists of an executive board and volunteers. “The young people who serve as volunteers learn things such as how to serve and also to build relationships.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Ohio State Is A Huge Favorite In Its Redemption Game vs. Virginia Tech In Week 1

first_imgVirginia Tech fans cheer on the Hokies.The lone loss in Ohio State’s 2014 national championship season came in Week 2 against Virginia Tech. The Buckeyes fell to the Hokies, 35-21. Redemption is expected on Sept. 7. Ohio State will open its national championship-defending season in Blacksburg, Va., against Virginia Tech on Labor Day. A blowout victory is predicted for Urban Meyer’s squad. The sportsbook 5Dimes released its initial odds for Week 1 and Ohio State is a huge favorite. Ohio State #Buckeyes will open the season favored by 19-points over the Virginia Tech Hokies. #OSU #OhioSt #OhioState (via 5Dimes)— Johnny Detroit (@Johnny_Detroit) February 12, 2015Ohio State and Virginia Tech’s kickoff time has yet to be released, but with the game occurring on Labor Day, a night game at Lane Stadium is probable.last_img read more

Jim Harbaugh Blasts Nick Saban In Twitter Response To Satellite Camp Rant

first_imgJim Harbaugh argues with a referee.ANN ARBOR, MI – NOVEMBER 25: Jim Harbaugh head coach of the Michigan Wolverines talks with the referee first half against the Ohio State Buckeyes on November 25, 2017 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)It happened, everyone. Jim Harbaugh is taking direct shots at Nick Saban on Twitter. This afternoon, Saban went on a lengthy rant against satellite camps, which Harbaugh has been the loudest proponent of over the last two seasons. Saban mentioned Harbaugh directly during his screed, though he was fairly diplomatic when bringing up the Michigan head coach. From AL.com:“I’m not blaming Jim Harbaugh, I’m not saying anything about him,” Saban said. “I’m just saying it’s bad for college football. Jim Harbaugh can do whatever he wants to do. I’m not saying anything bad about him if he thinks that’s what’s best. There needs to be somebody that looks out for what’s best for the game, not what’s best for the Big 10 or what’s best for the SEC, or what’s best for Jim Harbaugh, but what’s best for the game of college football — the integrity of the game, the coaches, the players and the people that play it. That’s bigger than all of this.Apparently, that doesn’t matter to Harbaugh, who put an unnamed Saban on blast moments ago.“Amazing” to me- Alabama broke NCAA rules & now their HC is lecturing us on the possibility of rules being broken at camps. Truly “amazing.”— Coach Harbaugh (@CoachJim4UM) June 1, 2016Jim Harbaugh won’t stop until he’s taken shots at every single rival coach in the college football world.last_img read more

NASCAR Legend Jimmie Johnson Builds House For Habitat For Humanity

first_imgSix-time NASCAR Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson swapped out his racing helmet for a hard hat this past weekend and teamed up with longtime partner Lowe’s and Habitat For Humanity Las Vegas to raise the walls of a new home at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.Nearly 100 Lowe’s Heroes employee volunteers joined Johnson and his pit crew to frame a four-bedroom Habitat home that will be transferred to Henderson, Nevada, and completed in partnership with a local family. Throughout the weekend, Lowe’s and Habitat gave race fans at the track the chance to sign up for a future Habitat build and encouraged them to enlist the help of a friend or family member to multiply their impact.Before stepping into his No. 48 Kobalt Chevrolet SS for the Kobalt 400 on Sunday, Johnson presented the family with the key to their new home.“I can’t think of a better way to have kicked off race weekend than raising the walls on Friday and celebrating with the family today,” Johnson said on Sunday. “It’s just amazing to see what happens when Lowe’s and Habitat team up.”“There’s a great need for affordable housing in Las Vegas, across the country and around the world,” said Colleen Finn Ridenhour, deputy director for Habitat for Humanity International. “We’re grateful to have the support of Lowe’s and Jimmie Johnson to help us build a home and raise awareness of the need for volunteers to help us in our mission. As we ramp up construction activity this spring, volunteers will be critical to our success in revitalizing communities and helping families obtain the dream of homeownership.”Lowe’s has partnered with Habitat for Humanity for more than a decade to build homes and revitalize communities around the country. Since 2003, Lowe’s has committed more than $63 million to Habitat and helped nearly 4,000 families improve their living conditions. Anyone interested in volunteering can learn more at Habitat.org/Lowes. 
”We’re proud to help Habitat Las Vegas continue its transformational work in Southern Nevada,” said Larry Edens, market director for Lowe’s Las Vegas stores. “We hope this extraordinary build inspires race fans to support Habitat projects in their own communities.”last_img read more

Editors note This story is about infanticide — t

first_imgEditor’s note: This story is about infanticide — the killing of a newborn baby — and includes graphic descriptions of that practice.We had to pass two strictly-manned, massive gates to access the inner courtyard of the prison in Thies, the third largest city in Senegal. The women’s ward was off to the right, behind another wall and another smaller gate. It was like a small house, a cramped concrete structure without cells or bars. On the ground, mattresses were pressed against each other, blanketing the concrete floor. Women sat languidly on them or clustered in the courtyard outside.We were here to speak to women accused of infanticide — killing their newborn baby. It is the second-most common reason women are in jail in Senegal (drug trafficking is number one.). In 2015, 19 percent of the country’s 283 female prisoners were in prison for the crime of infanticide, according to the United Nations Office for Human Rights in West Africa. “It’s a practice, it’s a very common practice,” says Moustapha Diakhaté, a member of parliament, “it’s terrible, there are an enormous number of cases. There is a lot of infanticide in Senegal.”In some countries, like China and India, this practice has been employed by families for gender selection: families who prefer boys choose to kill infant girls. But in Senegal, experts say, infanticide is not related to gender. Rather, it is a response to taboo pregnancies, carried out mostly in isolation by women. “I hid [my pregnancy] because I was surprised and I was in shock. I was also scared of what my in-laws would say,” said F, a woman imprisoned for infanticide.Due to the immense stigma and social ostracization around the practice, the five women we interviewed asked that their identity be protected. They are identified by their first initial.The women we interviewed had what would be termed an “unwanted pregnancy” in public health jargon, but the term doesn’t capture the profundity of their feelings. An impossible pregnancy might be closer. One teenager was raped while working as a maid. Another woman had a brief extramarital affair after her husband left the country for work and she was living with her in-laws. “In our society, when a girl has sexual relations outside of marriage it’s a dishonor for the family, even worse when she gets pregnant. The two make a double dishonor,” explains Abdoulaye Thiam, director of the National School of Social Work in Dakar. “The women prefer to get rid of the baby.”The imprisoned women we interviewed were either convicted of infanticide or waiting to be judged — in 2015 over half of the country’s female inmates were in pre-trial detentions, which can last for years. Some women accused of infanticide don’t receive a verdict for five years.Their memories were often cloudy and fragmented, as is typical for people experiencing severe trauma. They described feelings of paranoia, panic and shame. Sometimes their stories shifted midway through. Their complicated emotions, justifications and choices in impossible situations show how human the issue is.Some of them cried as they were being interviewed.”Those who commit infanticide are not in a normal psychological state. When you light a match or when a spoon falls she jumps. She believes someone is always chasing her,” says Abdou Fodé Sow, director of Maison Rose, a safe house for women facing domestic violence in Dakar. The charity has hosted women accused of infanticide who were disowned by their families.”For the media [in Senegal], these women are monsters,” said Amy Sakho, a lawyer with the Association of Senegalese Women Lawyers, a women’s rights organization that advocates for and represents women facing myriad legal issues, including infanticide. “I often tell [journalists] to try to see what could be behind this, to try to understand how she could have come to this after carrying her baby for nine months.”Some experts believe that the strict abortion laws in Senegal are a contributing factor. “The link we must make is between an unwanted pregnancy and infanticide. Those who commit infanticide could not access a safe abortion,” said Dr. Seynabou Ba, a technical adviser at the Ministry of Health. Abortions are illegal in Senegal except when the health of the mother is in danger — and even then only with the consent of two doctors and a prosecutor. That kind of consent is nearly impossible to obtain. A task force of women lawyers, activists and lawmakers are working to change the law to allow abortions in the case of rape, incest and health of the mother, but the proposed bill is still at the ministerial level, and so far there is no date set to vote on it in parliament.Even those who believe abortion laws should be more liberal aren’t sure that would bring down the number of instances of infanticide. Sakho, the lawyer, says of her clients: “When I ask if she had the possibility to abort, she responds that it’s forbidden … all she knows is that abortion is prohibited by the law and above all by religion.” Senegal is a majority Muslim and deeply religious country.”We realize that the law comes at the end of a process. We are working first on society, mentalities and acceptance,” Dr. Ba said. Activists have held public debates on TV and radio to try to gently bring people around to the idea that in the cases of rape or incest, abortion could be permissible. But it’s a sensitive topic. When a mid-level imam issued a fatwa condemning abortion last year, the pro-reform activists paused activities for a few months.She Had An Affair And Hid Her PregnancyF told us that her husband was away from home for seven years, looking for work in Mauritania and then Gabon. During that time, F said, she slept with another man — just once — and got pregnant.She cried as she described the affair. She said the man put a spell on her to seduce her: “I was never an easy woman. I just don’t know what made me make a choice like that.”Living with her in-laws, she tried to conceal the pregnancy. “There were certain family members who suspected, but each time, I denied it, up until I delivered,” she said.F delivered in her bedroom alone, then said she fainted. She claimed that the baby was stillborn and that her family found her with the child in the room. But in her case file there is a photograph of the child’s body, just removed from the septic tank.Free After 3 Years In PrisonE was around 12 or 13 when she married. She had her first child soon after. After her third child, her husband died. She never remarried but went on to have four more children with another man. When he went blind, she became the family’s sole breadwinner, carrying basins of water from a well to a nearby construction site and selling drinking water to the masons.During her eighth pregnancy she continued her work and says she was exhausted, earning just a couple of dollars a day. When she delivered at home, E said the baby boy was stillborn, and she buried him in her yard. Two days later the police arrived and arrested her. She was found guilty of infanticide and sentenced to six years in prison. After three years, she was released for good behavior.Now she lives in a small coastal town and works on her brother’s farm in exchange for a small home and some food for her children. E spoke softly, sitting with hunched shoulders on the floor. While she acknowledged she is still suffering, she is grateful to be out of jail. “It’s better to be free without money than trapped between four walls,” she said.The Infant Was Thrown In A Septic Tank — And SurvivedN’s mother tried to kill her the day she was born. Her mother, B, was a student when she got pregnant. “I did not have my head in the pregnancy. I was never sick. The only thing I was thinking of was my studies,” she said.She delivered at home with her boyfriend, who told her to throw the baby in the septic tank. They did, then B went to school. She fainted and her teachers took her to the hospital, where the doctors determined she had just given birth. Though she denied it, the police went home and found newborn N alive in the septic tank. She still has a scar on her cheek where her face hit the edge of the tank when her parents threw her in. When N survived, B said, “I cried a lot, I regretted what I had done. I always said, if one day God gives me a child, I would take care of it.”Now three years old, N lives with her maternal grandmother while her mother serves time in prison for attempted infanticide.Ricci Shryock and Allyn Gaestel reported from Senegal with support from the International Women’s Media Foundation. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2031/IMG15864.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more