What the Waratahs want for Christmas

first_imgHis sentiments were echoed by the team’s General Manager Chris Webb, whose response was, “Three days’ sleep.”Having recently returned to Australia from Ireland, Senior Assistant Coach Alan Gaffney asked for “a great Australian summer – or at least some warm gear for training!”Two players who will also welcome the return of the sunshine in the hope of making the most of their Christmas gifts are are Scottish-born Brendan McKibbin, who hopes for a remote controlled helicopter, and Brackin Karauria-Henry for whom a surfboard is top of the list. SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 03: Kane Douglas performs a drill during a Waratahs Super Rugby training session at McKay Oval, Centennial Park on November 3, 2011 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images) Kane Douglas training with the Waratahs in a dreary McKay Oval, SydneyAs they begin their last week of pre-season training before taking a well-earned Christmas break, we asked some of the HSBC Waratahs what’s at the top of their Christmas list.“An upgrade to Fox HD please, and maybe a 3D TV,” was Assistant Coach Scott Bowen’s response.“A bit of sunshine and a good feed,” was the request from lock Kane Douglas.Defence Coach Greg Mumm said, “I’ve asked my mum for a pair of Asics Tigers or a nice meal out somewhere, either something Japanese or Kingsleys Steakhouse.”New dad John Ulugia responded with, “Some sleep! And a break from the city to spend some time with my partner Georgina and new daughter Ivona.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS But it was Daniel Halangahu’s response typified those of many of his team mates. “A week off and a big Christmas lunch,” he said.The squad will be back in training in the New Year, in time for their first Super XV fixture on Saturday 25 February against defending champions Queensland Reds.last_img read more

Rugby Championship: Round 5 ready to rock

first_imgAll Blacks: Israel Dagg; Ben Smith, Conrad Smith, Ma’a Nonu, Julian Savea; Aaron Cruden, Aaron Smith; Tony Woodcock, Andrew Hore, Owen Franks, Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock, Liam Messam, Sam Cane, Kieran Read (c).Subs: Keven Mealamu, Wyatt Crockett, Charlie Faumuina, Jeremy Thrush, Steven Luatua, Tawera Kerr-Barlow, Beauden Barrett, Charles Piutau. Just another training session: The All Blacks, led by a darting Israel Dagg, go about their preparation for Round 5By Alan DymockBREAKS OVER, injuries assessed and motivations re-stocked, it’s time for the Rugby Championship to bark back.du Preez and me: Fourie du Preez and Willie La RouxSouth Africa will be attempting to get their Championship title challenge back on track as they welcome the beleaguered Aussies to Newlands this weekend, a place where the Wallabies haven’t won in 21 years. The glimmer of hope comes from the fact that South Africa hadn’t beaten Australia in Brisbane for 42 years but then hushed the hoodoo with a resounding 38-12 victory last time they met. Maybe Australia can return the favour?It is not impossible, but not many would back it. Although some may be surprised with the reinstatement of Fourie du Preez to scrum-half and Adriaan Strauss to hooker for the ‘Boks, it is still a formidable, grunt-worthy pack being twinned with a backline capable to tearing past Australia.They in turn have moved reliable workhorse Adam Ashley-Cooper to the wing to replace Nick Cummins and Joe Tomane comes in for the disgraced and exiled James O’Connor. Tevita Kuridrani forms a midfield partnership with Christian Leali’ifano which Jean de Villiers and co. may be excited about sendigng JJ Englebrect past.The fear is that this is another one-sided game…That fear could also be extended to New Zealand versus Argentina in La Plata. The Pumas did run the All Blacks surprisingly close in their first meeting of the Championship, scoring the first try of that match through Juan Manuel Leguizamon – a man who has joined a short list of Argentines who have scored against all three of the SANZAR nations after dotting down against Australia last time out – but this Kiwi team seems as unrelenting as an insomniac’s alarm clock.Hoping to kick on: The Wallabies warm up for the ‘BoksSo while Argentina have made wholesale changes in their backline, with a new centre-pairing of Bosch and Fernandez standing out, they are still up against Smith and Nonu. The replacements for the Kiwis are vastly experienced, too. Andrew Hore comes in and Dan Carter is replaced again by Aaron Cruden.So when Kieran Read feels a little under the weather it’s OK; he could just be replaced by Messam at 8 and Steven Luatua occupies the blindside, if Luatua is not considered a capable 8 himself. The All Blacks would then be short on the bench, but they have the quality to do without.Mind you, this could be Argentina’s greatest chance ever to beat the All Blacks, however unlikely that is. A man down in the back-row, the Pumas could throw everything they have at the All Black’s breakdown. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Springboks: Zane Kirchner, Willie le Roux, JJ Engelbrect, Jean de Villiers, Bryan Habana, Morne Steyn, Fourie du Preez, Tendai Mtawarira, Adriaan Strauss, Jannie du Plessis, Eben Etzebeth, Flip van der Merwe, Francois Louw, Willem Alberts, Duane Vermeulen.Subs: Bismarck du Plessis, Gurthro Steenkamp, Coenie Oosthuizen, Juandre Kruger, Siya Kolisi, Ruan Pienaar, Pat Lambie, Jan Serfontein.Wallabies: Israel Folau, Adam Ashley-Cooper, Tevita Kuridrani, Christian Lealiifano, Joe Tomane, Quade Cooper, Nic White, James Slipper, Stephen Moore, Ben Alexander, Rob Simmons, James Horwill (c), Scott Fardy, Michael Hooper, Ben Mowen.Subs: Saia Faingaa, Benn Robinson, Sekope Kepu, Sitaleki Timani, Ben McCalman, Will Genia, Matt Toomua, Chris Feauai-Sautia.Pumas: Juan Martin Hernandez; Lucas Gonzalez Amorosino, Marcelo Bosch, Santiago Fernandez, Juan Imhoff; Nicolas Sanchez, Martin Landajo; Marcos Ayerza, Eusebio Guinazu, Juan Figallo, Julia Farias Cabello, Patricio Albacete, Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe (c), Pablo Matera, Juan Manual Leguizamon.Subs: Agustin Creevy, Nahuel Lobo, Juan Pablo Orlandi, Mariano Galarza, Benjamin Macome, Tomas Cubelli, Felipe Contempomi, Horacio Agulla.center_img If they want their first ever win they have to go high-risk. CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA – SEPTEMBER 26: Australian Wallabies players of the Wallabies in action during an Australian Wallabies training session at City Park on September 26, 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Ashley Vlotman/Gallo Images/Getty Images) last_img read more

WATCH: Montpellier team-mates fight each other before kick-off

first_imgThey went on to beat Racing 41-3. Jan Serfontein scored a brace of tries while Nico Janse van Rensburg, Timoci Nagusa and Louis Picamoles also crossed in the bonus-point win.The margin of victory is notable when you consider this was a top-of-the-table clash. Montpellier and Racing are leading the way in the French top flight this season, but this result now puts Vern Cotter’s team eight points clear in the table on 66 points.Racing sit second on 58 with Toulon and Toulouse, both with 57 points, following in third and fourth.Both Montpellier and Racing were missing players who were representing France in their Six Nations match against England in Paris.Related: France 22-16 England match report LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Montpellier’s Benjamin Fall and Yacouba Camara were heavily involved in France’s win, while Kieran Galletier made an appearance off the bench. Racing’s Maxime Machenaud, Wenceslas Lauret and Cedate Gomes Sa also played in the victory, with scrum-half Machenaud kicking four penalties.Be sure to follow Rugby World on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. It’s certainly unusual to see team-mates clashing at a match, although we do often here about times when things have boiled over in training. However, it didn’t seem to affect Montpellier’s performance at the Altrad Stadium. Montpellier team-mates fight each other before kick-offThe physical nature of rugby means we often see pushing and shoving during matches. There are tussles after scrums and penalty awards, and unfortunately there are occasions where things get more serious and punches are thrown. Yet these altercations are always between players on opposing sides.Before Montpellier’s Top 14 game against Racing 92, players from the same team were seen fighting with each other! And this wasn’t a minor incident either, with team-mates having to hold the two main Montpellier protagonists back as they tried to land punches.Footage of the scrap between Bismarck du Plessis, the former South Africa hooker, and prop Mohamed Haouas was caught by French broadcaster Canal+ – watch it here: Incredible footage of two Montpellier players tussling with each other before their Top 14 game against Racing 92 Flashpoint: Bismarck du Plessis, here in Barbarians action, was involved in a pre-match fight (Getty Images) last_img read more

Five things we learnt about rugby in November

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Danger man: Semi Radradra in action for Fiji at the World Cup (Getty Images) Let’s be honest, it’s not just Biggar who has improved under Boyd. Northampton’s demolition of Tigers was as easy on the eye as it was on the scoreboard. Saints are back.Six weeks for a gouge is laughableIt’s difficult to tell when British voters started becoming disaffected with politics, which they clearly are. Sadly, the same is now true with rugby’s disciplinary process. That La Rochelle’s Pierre Bourgarit received a six-week ban for a blatant gouge is worrying.This wasn’t some 1980s gouge delivered in a dark, sweaty, ruck with just anecdotal evidence to account for it. This was live on TV. In front of your eyes, my eyes and, most importantly, Tom Curry’s eyes.Bourgarit didn’t clumsily go for a head grab and then slide down for the gouge, nor did he go for a throat grab and then slide up. He looked like a free-climber feeling for a dent from which to pull. The gouge is the filthiest of all filth in rugby and for it to be worth just such-and-such weeks, reduced to such-and-such weeks, due to such-and-such previous record and such-and-such an apology is laughable.Social media has even stopped making jokes about the lottery of disciplinary panels. There was a time when jokes about taking good quality biscuits and wearing a tie to reduce the punishment were very popular on Twitter. Not any more. When people can’t even be bothered to make fun of rugby’s disciplinary issues, you know you’ve got a real problem.Dragon’s have a golden back row in the makingIn a period when we’re discussing the breaking of salary caps, it is pleasing to see the Dragons (a team that never has to worry about breaking a salary cap) discovering a special group of back-row forwards.Aaron Wainwright, Ollie Griffiths and Taine Basham have the making of an entire Wales back row, grown organically, from one club. In Wainwright, they have a six/eight who has already shown that he can cope with Test rugby. He has the contact work of a Test-level six and the pace and ball-carrying of a regional centre.Griffiths has the build and game of Sam Warburton and will only improve further by playing under the tutelage of his carbon-copy when he becomes a regular Wales squad member.In Basham, and his explosive carrying, they may have the makings of a young Ardie Savea. Tom Curry and Sam Underhill may be the new generation of back-row forwards who are currently getting the headlines, but you’ll be hearing plenty about the new Dragons’ unit. That is a certainty. From the joy of Semi Radradra to the despair of laughable bans, Paul Williams reflects on rugby’s recent goings-oncenter_img Semi Radradra signing proves power of PremiershipThe English Premiership has always attracted quality players from overseas. Since the game has turned professional, the value of English club rugby has been a flame to the most beautiful of rugby moths.However, Bristol Bears’ signing of Semi Radradra feels different. It seems like the signing that has tipped the balance of ‘signature power’ from the Top 14 to the Premiership.Radradra may not have been voted World Rugby’s Player of the Year, but he is ‘THE’ marquee player in the global game. He’s also one of those rare players who attracts the buying power of both rugby codes, which often drives the price even higher – see Latrell Mitchell.He is arguably the only player in the world who plays well regardless of the team around him. He isn’t reliant on possession, territory or quality players in the channels next to him – he can do it on his own.You could throw Radradra a potato behind his own try-line and by the time he’d carried it to the other try-line, it would have become triple-cooked chips with balsamic vinegar and organic sea salt. I cannot wait to see him play in the Premiership.Finn Russell’s M-eggAll of the greatest athletes end up either becoming known by their first name or by a ‘move’ that they made famous. In basketball we have Michael and LeBron, the Larry Bird ‘Fadeaway’ and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s ‘Skyhook’. Football has Cristiano, Sir Alex and the ‘Cruyff’ turn. Now, rugby has the Finn Russell ‘M-egg’.It is similar to a nutmeg in football, but far more impressive. Firstly, it is accomplished using a ball whose shape renders it as reliable as an election manifesto. But by far the biggest difference between the rugby and football ‘meg’ is the fact that in football the defender is barely allowed to touch you, whereas in rugby they can still mangle you.Russell’s creative assault on Rory Scannell’s legs was beautiful, but perhaps more importantly it showed how more effective creative outside-halves can be when behind a dominant pack.Russell is arguably the most creative ten in the world, yet he looks like a different player when playing for Scotland compared to Racing 92. With Scotland, there simply isn’t the forward platform that allows Russell to consistently create. With limited possession, in a Test environment, his decisions appear reckless and rash. Behind a dominant club pack, he looks like the creative genius that he is.Biggar is thriving under BoydTo those that have watched Dan Biggar play through his entire career, it will come as no surprise that he is demonstrating a three-dimensional skill-set at Northampton Saints. But to those who have only seen him play for Wales, his ability to step, play on the gain-line and throw insane reverse passes may seem incongruous.The truth is Biggar has always had those skills, but under some coaches they haven’t been the priority – which is understandable given how accurate his kicking game is. Yet under Chris Boyd, the Super Rugby master, and arguably the freest flowing coach in the global game, Biggar looks like the ten that he always been. Rugby World magazine’s new issue comes with a free 2020 calendar and goes on sale on Tuesday 3 December.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Who would be first pick in a Gallagher Premiership Draft?

first_img TAGS: Highlight No leading European or southern hemisphere competition has held a draft, yet the prospect is alluring, as USA Rugby’s chief analyst Jimmy Harrison explains.“It’s almost like the teams gambling a bit, because they’re putting all their future into this player,” says Harrison. “There’s the excitement that this guy could make our franchise the next great team for the next ten years – or he might not pan out. It’s exciting for the team and exciting for the players.”In such a crowded sporting landscape, it might be a way for rugby to set itself apart from other sports. Consumers like to enjoy more content than solely the on-field product – and so the excitement of a draft might just form part of rugby’s fight for Generation Z.Moreover, draft systems allow for an equalising of the league, with bottom-dwellers given the first opportunity to select a future star. If Gallagher Premiership ring-fencing goes ahead, a draft system could be the way to go.Fantasy Gallagher Premiership Draft: How would it work?Consider this: the Premiership’s finest talent from the 1998-99 school year and younger all eligible in a Premiership draft. Players such as Marcus Smith, Louis Rees-Zammit, Cameron Redpath, Alfie Barbeary and Ollie Lawrence.Quarterback Trevor Lawrence is one of the top picks in the 2021 NFL Draft (Getty Images)If the current league table was flipped, with Worcester getting the first pick and top-of-the-table Bristol choosing last, how would this fantasy draft develop? What positions would be prioritised?Former England prop Alex Corbisiero says: “It’s basically the areas that you spend big on, the tighthead and fly-half as two of the higher-paid players. Potentially a lineout-operating second-row, or other pieces like that which are hard to replace, or where it’s high value to bring people in. It’s going to come down to the teams drafting players in the position they need.”Aside from the big names, Corbisiero also reserves praise for some lesser-known forwards.“Marcus Street at Exeter Chiefs. Joe Heyes. Manny Iyogun. Marcus is starting for Exeter at only 21! Players like Chunya Munga – the second-row at London Irish. 100%. He is going to be a stud.”Related: How a Premiership Draft could change English rugbyBearing Corbisiero’s views in mind, and with Worcester ready to make the first selection – how will the Fantasy Gallagher Premiership Draft pan out?Fantasy Gallagher Premiership Draft: Who would be picked?1. Worcester Warriors – Marcus Smith (DoB – 14 February 1999)Worcester select their fly-half of both the present and future by drafting Harlequins standout Smith as the #1 pick. They immediately get themselves a top-tier starting ten who, if he still can’t catch Eddie Jones’s eye, will be available for the entirety of the season.Worcester have lacked a distinctive attacking identity since their return to the Premiership – an issue Smith is sure to address. Like Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence at the top of the NFL Draft – a slam-dunk pick. 2. Newcastle Falcons – Ioan Lloyd (DoB – 5 April 2001)Another fly-half-needy team, but with Marcus Smith off the board, there are no regular starting options. There is an intriguing young crop of playmakers emerging, headlined by Lloyd, Charlie Atkinson, George Barton and Manu Vunipola.Already capped by Wales, Lloyd has shown the most flashes thus far in a fledgling career – and has the versatility to cover a variety of positions in the backs. Newcastle’s back-line possibly lacks a game-breaker; Lloyd will provide that wherever he plays. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Who would be first pick in a Gallagher Premiership Draft? One of the most intriguing events in the American sporting calendar is the NFL Draft. With a potentially generational class of quarterbacks waiting to be chosen, the world’s sporting media will gather in Cleveland this week to see the dreams of players be realised.A primetime event, drafts are filled with glitz and glamour – but they are more than mere razzmatazz.Athletes build their brands through the spotlight of professionalism, scouting networks are rigorously tested, while fans feel a burgeoning optimism that their franchise has drafted the league’s next superstar. For one weekend a year, every side is hopeful.So, what if such a draft existed in rugby? Well, aficionados may note that Major League Rugby held its inaugural draft in June 2020. Winger Conner Mooneyham had the honour of being the first-ever rugby draftee, chosen by the Dallas Jackals. Cameron Redpath may have been an enticing option as a long-term replacement for Jimmy Gopperth.5. Leicester Tigers – Cameron Redpath (DoB – 23 December 1999)Leicester’s youth academy is back at the front of the talent production line, with players such as George Martin, Jack van Poortvliet, Joe Heyes and Freddie Steward stars in the making. You look at Leicester and Steve Borthwick’s philosophy, and a forward seems the obvious selection. With minutes until England U20s take on Scotland, get to know full back @freddiesteward_ Watch live (KO 19:30) https://t.co/lennBj4L5J#SCOvENG pic.twitter.com/WjG55AI9fz— England Rugby (@EnglandRugby) February 7, 2020 10. Sale Sharks – Marcus Street (DoB – 6 February 1999)Can you imagine Alex Sanderson turning down the opportunity to sign one of the most promising young tightheads in the league? Street mauled current French senior prop Jean-Baptiste Gros when they faced off at U20 level.Would form a frightening front-row combination with Coenie Oosthuizen and Akker van der Merwe. However, the second-receiver role is so important in modern rugby, so the chance to pick up Redpath might be too tantalising for Borthwick to resist. 11. Exeter Chiefs – George Martin (DoB – 18 June 2001)For teams near the top of the league, the draft is a luxury. Exeter’s squad lacks any obvious weaknesses and has an excellent age profile. So what should their drafting philosophy be? To fortify existing strengths.Rob Baxter will relish taking Martin – a hybrid second-row/flanker who has already been capped by England. He projects as a long-term replacement for 32-year-old Don Armand, while there is no better place for him to fill-out his bulk than Sandy Park.George Martin training with England (Getty Images)12. Bristol Bears – Freddie Steward (DoB – 5 December 2000)With Max Malins returning to Saracens, Bristol will be looking for a top-quality replacement full-back. With Ioan Lloyd snaffled by Newcastle, the choice here has to be Steward.He is already one of the best aerial specialists in the league and has established himself as Leicester’s starting full-back at only 20 years old.Josh Hodge or Bath’s Tom de Glanville might be others to consider.center_img 8. Northampton Saints – Joe Heyes (DoB – 13 April 1999)When Northampton have won this season, it has been based on a rapidly improving scrum. Expect them to double-down on this, plus get one over on their East Midlands rivals Leicester, by bringing in tighthead prospect Heyes.The first prop off the board, the position is difficult to evaluate at such a young age but Heyes, who has just turned 22, has already made 65 appearances in the Leicester front row and has been called into England training camps by Eddie Jones.Joe Heyes carries for Leicester (Getty Images)9. Harlequins – Charlie Atkinson (DoB – 6 October 2001)Harlequins lost Marcus Smith to the first pick of the draft, so a fly-half has to be the choice here. Atkinson’s sprightly demeanour bears the closest resemblance to Smith, with George Barton and Manu Vunipola also possibilities.Quins were unafraid to throw Smith the starting ten jersey at only 18, so the same chance coming to Atkinson at 19 is no cause for concern.Scrum coach Adam Jones may have pushed to retain promising tighthead Fin Baxter. Unlucky to have his debut Six Nations curtailed by injury, the ball-playing 12 would form an absolutely lethal combination with George Ford.Expect Leicester to have given serious thought to retaining Joe Heyes as Dan Cole’s successor at tighthead.6. Bath – Ollie Lawrence (DOB – 18 September 1999)Lawrence might have expected to go higher in the draft, having already been capped six times by Eddie Jones. However, with Bath having had Cameron Redpath nabbed by Leicester, they’re in the market for a centre.A back-line containing Lawrence alongside Danny Cipriani, Jonathan Joseph, Joe Cokanasiga and Anthony Watson is a salivating thought – giving Bath a side with more sauce than a Heinz factory.Anthony Watson and Ollie Lawrence during an England camp (Getty Images)7. London Irish – Ted Hill (DoB – 26 March 1999)Jimmy Harrison has stressed the importance of drafting young leaders and Hill fits that description. After all, he was made Worcester captain at the absurdly young age of 21?!London Irish are replete with young talent in the backs, and while the temptation to retain Ollie Hassell-Collins must be strong, the chance to not only add forward muscle but also gain captaincy experience is too much to resist. 4. Wasps – Alfie Barbeary (DoB – 5 October 2000)Wasps are set at fly-half and tighthead prop – with Jacob Umaga less than two months over the age limit. This allows Lee Blackett’s side to go BPA – best player available.They’d be desperate to keep Barbeary, possibly the league’s most exciting emerging forward, whether he settles at hooker or back-row. His selection guarantees Wasps a destructive ball-carrier for the next decade. Alfie Barbeary, Joe Heyes, Ioan Lloyd, Ted Hill and Marcus Smith (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. 3. Gloucester – Louis Rees-Zammit (DoB – 2 February 2001)A wealth of options for Gloucester. Having signed Adam Hastings from Glasgow, they’re no longer in the market for a fly-half, but with a possible need at prop, might they be tempted to take a forward?Ultimately, it’s hard to see them spurning the opportunity to keep Wales’ Rees-Zammit at Kingsholm. While wing isn’t a crucial position comparatively, Rees-Zammit’s Six Nations form proved him a transcendent talent. Let us know who your Fantasy Gallagher Premiership Draft picks would be by emailing [email protected] With American sports fans gripped by the NFL Draft, Jacob Whitehead ponders which players would be in demand if rugby had a similar systemlast_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Por Onell A. SotoPosted Apr 19, 2013 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rapidísimas Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Las noticias de Venezuela son tantas que se necesitarían todas las páginas de un periódico dominical para publicarlas. Quizás el mejor resumen de la situación actual lo ha hecho Antonio María Delgado, periodista de El Nuevo Herald: “El régimen bolivariano parece estar dispuesto a cruzar el punto de no retorno para dejar atrás toda apariencia de democracia, al hacer planes para encarcelar al máximo líder de la oposición, silenciar las voces de los diputados en el Congreso y darle carta blanca a la represión.“Las acciones del régimen de Caracas se producen en momentos en que enfrenta una crisis de legitimidad, con la oposición cuestionando los resultados de los comicios presidenciales del domingo en las que el Consejo Nacional Electoral declaró ganador al líder de la Revolución Bolivariana, Nicolás Maduro, por un margen inferior a dos puntos porcentuales. Las cifras verdaderas son Maduro 44,3 por ciento y Capriles 53,5 por ciento.Sus decisiones anti-democráticas unidas “a las emergentes dudas sobre la legitimidad de origen del nuevo gobierno, podrían terminar de encasillar al régimen firmemente en la columna reservada para las dictaduras”.Estados Unidos ha dicho por boca de su secretario de Estado, John Kerry, que espera que Venezuela acceda a una auditoría electoral para dar confianza a la comunidad internacional, pero en Caracas se ha dicho oficialmente que “no habrá que contar los votos nuevamente”. Otros comentaristas dicen que ni el mismo Nicolás Maduro cree en el resultado de las elecciones y esto puede producirle un problema sicológico. Veremos.Varios letreros en las paredes piden la intervención de las fuerzas armadas a favor del pueblo según lo estipula la Constitución. Nicolás Maduro, anunció el jueves antes de volar a Lima para una reunión “de emergencia” de la Unasur que “mañana seré juramentado” y “estaré en la presidencia por largos años” para continuar los planes e ideales del comandante Hugo Chávez. Añadió que en Venezuela no existe una oposición “sino una conspiración permanente, aupada desde los Estados Unidos”.El papa Francisco dijo en una breve homilía el jueves pasado que “ser cristiano no es estudiar una carrera para convertirse en un abogado o en un médico cristiano, no. Ser cristiano es un don que nos hace ir adelante con el poder del Espíritu de anunciar a Jesucristo”.Durante los días 13 y 14 de abril la Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana, celebró, el Primer Encuentro en Misión, con la participación miles de feligreses, representantes de diócesis compañeras de los Estados Unidos y su clero en pleno. El obispo diocesano Julio César Holguín presidió el evento y retó a las iglesias a cumplir el mandato de la Gran Comisión apoyando a los pobres y todos los necesitados. Visiblemente emocionado el obispo dijo “si nosotros que hemos sido llamados por el Señor no lo hacemos ¿quién lo hará?”. La Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana tiene un total de 32 colegios, cuatro centros de cuidado infantil, 62 iglesias, dos clínicas y un asilo de ancianos.El gobierno cubano ha autorizado a las dirigentes de las Damas de Blanco para que viajen a Bruselas, Bélgica, para recibir el premio Sájarov que les fue concedido hace ocho años por el Parlamento Europeo. El Premio Sájarov para la Libertad de Conciencia, nombrado así en honor del científico y disidente soviético Andréi Sájarov, fue establecido en diciembre de 1985 por el Parlamento Europeo como un medio para homenajear a personas u organizaciones que han dedicado sus vidas o acciones a la defensa de los derechos humanos y las libertades.Al cumplir su primer mes en el cargo, el papa Francisco nombró un consejo de ocho cardenales de todo el mundo para que le asesore en el gobierno de la Iglesia Católica Romana y estudie un proyecto de reforma de la curia, un anuncio sorpresivo que indica su intención de lograr un cambio importante en el funcionamiento del papado. El chileno Francisco Javier Errázuriz y el hondureño Oscar Rodríguez Maradiaga son los únicos latinoamericanos en el consejo.Familiares de las víctimas de la matanza en Newtown han mostrado tristeza y agotamiento físico con el rechazo del Senado de Estados Unidos a una enmienda que hubiera establecido revisiones más cuidadosas de antecedentes en la compra de armas. En la masacre del 14 de diciembre fueron asesinados 20 niños junto con seis maestras.El FBI ha señalado a dos personas como sospechosas del atentado dinamitero del maratón de Boston. Tres personas murieron y más de 170 resultaron heridas cuando dos bombas estallaron cerca de la meta el lunes 15.VERDAD. La vida no se mide por las veces que respiras, sino por aquellos momentos que te dejan sin aliento. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

El Salvador: violencia, inseguridad e impunidad conducen al desplazamiento

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Por Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 21, 2014 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS El Salvador: violencia, inseguridad e impunidad conducen al desplazamiento Las ONG de carácter religioso responden a la crisis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] La hija de 13 años de Irene desapareció al salir de la escuela el 15 de febrero de 2012, en una municipalidad del noroeste de San Salvador controlada por las pandillas. El cadáver de la niña lo encontraron dos días después; Irene se enteró por un noticiero de la televisión local.“Estoy muy atemorizada por mis otros hijos, que algo les pueda ocurrir debido a la violencia”, dijo Irene, durante una entrevista con ENS en el Instituto de Derechos Humanos que tiene su sede en la Universidad Centroamericana en San Salvador.Ella tiene dos hijos de 10 y 13 años; uno desapareció brevemente y no habla del tema.Aunque Irene —éste no es su verdadero nombre— le gustaría ver procesados a los asesinos de su hija, la investigación que lleva a cabo el Estado, la cual incluye el secuestro y el asesinato semejante de otras cuatro niñas, significa que ella y su familia viven en constante temor de represalias. Independientemente de si prosigue la investigación, explica Karla Salas, abogada de derechos humanos, los miembros de la pandilla asociados con los asesinos la amenazan y la hostigan a ella y a su familia. No cuentan con ninguna protección.“Cuando el Estado se muestra negligente en el manejo de estos casos, la gente acude aquí”, agregó Salas.Dos de las pandillas más violentas de Centroamérica, la Mara Salvatrucha y Barrio 18, controlan y batallan por territorio en El Salvador, sobre todo en comunidades pobres y marginales donde la violencia, el asesinato, la violación, la extorsión y las amenazas permean la vida diaria de los vecinos, incluidos los niños. Es esta realidad la que en parte ha conducido a la crisis humanitaria que actualmente tiene lugar a lo largo de la frontera de EE.UU. y México, donde más de 44.000 menores no acompañados de El Salvador, Honduras y Guatemala —los otros dos países del Triángulo Norte [de América Central] con problemas de pandillerismo— han sido detenidos en el cruce de la frontera.“El problema de los menores no acompañados es sólo un elemento de un problema de inmigración más amplio. No es nuevo, es algo que se ha estado desarrollando a lo largo de dos o tres años, pero ahora es que ha cobrado notoriedad en la prensa”, dijo Noah Bullock, director ejecutivo de la Fundación Cristosal, una organización para el desarrollo comunitario basada en los derechos humanos que se arraiga en las iglesias anglicana y episcopal que funcionan en El Salvador.“Cuando miramos a la inmigración en Estados Unidos tendemos a verlo como un gran bloque, y lo entendemos como [el fenómeno] de personas que buscan trabajo y una vida mejor. Pero no nos fijamos en las personas que escapan de conflictos muy serios y de amenazas de violencia, y esos casos sacan a relucir problemas de protección”, afirmó.En Colombia, décadas de guerra civil y de violencia asociada con el crimen organizado han desplazado internamente a cinco millones de personas y cerca de 400.000 responden a los criterios para el reconocimiento de la condición de refugiado. La violencia de las pandillas y el crimen organizado han conducido al desplazamiento interno y externo de centroamericanos, aunque debido a la falta de una guerra declarada y de la naturaleza criminal del conflicto, el fenómeno no ha sido formalmente abordado desde la perspectiva de las violaciones de los derechos humanos y de la protección internacional, y los tradicionales procedimientos de asilo resultan difíciles de aplicar.A diferencia de Colombia, donde el desplazamiento interno y externo ha sido bien documentado por el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados y otros organismos no gubernamentales, el desplazamiento se estudia menos en Centroamérica.“Es un fenómeno menos visible, menos documentado en El Salvador, no existe realmente una estrategia nacional para abordarlo”, dijo Bullock.En efecto, los perfiles nacionales del ACNUR para El Salvador, Guatemala y Honduras juntos no incluyen ni un solo desplazado interno.La Fundación Cristosal cobró consciencia por primera vez de las personas desplazadas por la violencia cuando, junto con la Iglesia Anglicana-Episcopal de El Salvador, supervisó el programa de reasentamiento de refugiados del ACNUR.“El año pasado conseguimos más de 150 personas que eran salvadoreños y que buscaban asilo fuera del país, de manera que lo que vemos en los niños debería de verse como parte de un patrón histórico de desplazamiento que ha estado sucediendo durante mucho tiempo”, dijo Bullock en una entrevista con ENS en su oficina de San Salvador.Tanto el desplazamiento interno como externo, añadió Bullock, tienen causas comunes: falta de bienestar en las comunidades salvadoreñas, violencia generalizada e incapacidad del Estado de salvaguardar las vidas de las personas e imponer el imperio de la ley mediante el procesamiento de las organizaciones delictivas.“Todas esas cosas, la incapacidad de proteger a los testigos, la incapacidad de mantener escuelas y zonas seguras donde los niños tienen su esparcimiento… esas son áreas que han sido terreno de reclutamiento de las pandillas y donde fundamentalmente se hacen las amenazas”, explicó Bullock. “Son una causa común del desplazamiento interno y externo”.El ACNUR, en su informe sobre las necesidades de reasentamiento previstas para 2014 a nivel global, calculaba que habría 691.000 refugiados, sin tomar en cuenta el flujo de refugiados de Siria. En 2012, hubo 86.000 espacios disponibles.En el Día Mundial de los Refugiados en junio se informó que el número de refugiados en todo el mundo había sobrepasado los 50 millones por primera vez desde la primera guerra mundial.En 2014 se cumple el 30º. aniversario de la Declaración de Cartagena, la cual enmendaba la definición de 1951 y la de 1967 de lo que significa ser un refugiado para incluir a “personas que han huido de su país porque sus vidas, su seguridad o su libertad han sido amenazadas por la violencia generalizada, la agresión extranjera, los conflictos internos, la violación masiva de los derechos humanos u otras circunstancias que hayan perturbado seriamente el orden público”.Los países de América Central y México adoptaron el protocolo, que no fue reconocido por Estados Unidos, en un momento en que tanto Guatemala como El Salvador estaban librando guerras civiles y cuando los rebeldes contras luchaban contra el gobierno sandinista en Nicaragua.“En Centroamérica hubo desde fines de los años 60, y a través de los 70, los 80 y los 90 sus buenas tres décadas ininterrumpidas de guerra. Y luego las guerras terminaron y no hubo una resolución muy efectiva de algunas de esas causas estructurales; después hay otras dos décadas de conflicto social que no tienen un nombre como un conflicto armado tradicional, pero que producen muertes en la misma escala”, añadió Bullock. “De manera que, esencialmente, en Centroamérica ha habido 50 años de guerra de baja intensidad y en verdad no deberíamos de sorprendernos que tengamos una crisis de refugiados en Estados Unidos”.“Nunca nos atrevimos a usar la palabra ‘refugiado’; antes eran inmigrantes, eran ilegales… y ahora porque son niños estamos más dispuestos a ver a los centroamericanos que llegan a nuestras fronteras como algo más”, dijo Bullock. “Tres semanas de crisis humanitaria y de refugiados, cinco décadas de conflicto”.En una declaración del 10 de julio en que abordaba la crisis de la frontera, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori instó a los episcopales a dirigirse a sus legisladores y pedirles que apoyaran una “respuesta humanitaria adecuada a la crisis”.Entre tanto, la Fundación Cristosal trabaja con organizaciones de derechos humanos y la sociedad civil, entre ellos el Instituto de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Centroamericana, para formular un análisis más abarcador del desplazamiento interno y externo, así como una propuesta que aborde ambos fenómenos, según Bullock.“Lo que estamos tratando de hacer ahora con nuestro programa es responder a esas necesidades, pero no hay respuestas perfectas porque las causas son muy estructurales y profundas”, apuntó. “Tienes que ser capaz de intentarlo y ayudar a alguien en una crisis humanitaria inmediata, pero también tratar de empeñarte en resolver algunos de los problemas estructurales que están creando las crisis humanitarias”, afirmó.En la edición del 13 de julio de La prensa, uno de los dos principales diarios de El Salvador, los titulares de primera página iban desde la Copa Mundial a los 375.000 casos de inmigración bloqueados en los tribunales de EE.UU., así como el homicidio de dos adolescentes. En el cuerpo del periódico había una noticia sobre una muchacha violada por su tío en su viaje al norte, un artículo que se proponía la disuasión de emprender viajes semejantes. A principios de semana, había artículos centrados en tratar de disuadir a las familias de que enviaran a sus hijos al norte.“Esto es algo que la Casa Blanca señala”, dijo Bullock. “Los tratantes de personas y la información que les dan a las familias parecen motivarlas a enviar a sus hijos; creen que les va mejor corriendo el riesgo en base a la información que el coyote les da…  queremos que las personas cuenten con otros medios de obtener información que sea un poco más objetiva que las que le daría un tratante de personas”.Los abogados de la Fundación Cristosal, explicó él, no intervienen, sin embargo, en la toma de decisiones de vida o muerte con las personas; eso es algo que en último término le compete a un miembro de la familia. Lo que hacen los abogados es tratar de darles a las familias una buena información, de manera que puedan tomar decisiones con conocimiento de causa.“La Casa Blanca gasta un millón de dólares en publicidad para disuadir a las familias de enviar a sus hijos”, añadió Bullock. “Pero eso no es más que otra forma de propaganda; a lo que las personas responden es al auténtico consejo objetivo de organizaciones como Cristosal”.La Universidad Centroamericana fundó el Instituto de Derechos Humanos en 1986 en respuesta al número abrumador de violaciones de derechos humanos cometidos durante la guerra civil de 12 años en El Salvador, en la cual asesinaron a 75,000 personas. En ese tiempo el instituto hizo hincapié en la inmigración debido al gran número de personas que huían del país para escapar del conflicto armado, dijo Salas, el abogado de derechos humanos que representa a Irene, en una entrevista en su oficina de la universidad.Irene se despierta a las 3:00 A.M. todas las mañanas y se dirige a su puesto de venta de comida. Para las 2:00 P.M. ya está de vuelta a su casa de donde no vuelve a salir. Sus hijos van a la escuela y vuelven, y nada más. La familia, incluida la madre de Irene, vive con $6 diarios, dijo ella.El ACNUR no cuenta con una oficina dentro del país para los que buscan asilo. Irene y su familia deben hacer su petición de asilo fuera de El Salvador. Salas dijo que ella y otros trabajan con una agencia catolicorromana en Europa —la Universidad Centroamericana es católica— que ha convenido en ayudar a la familia con su petición, pero ellos deben cubrir por sí mismos los gastos de viaje.En el ínterin, la familia vive con miedo y sigue recibiendo amenazas de los miembros de la pandilla que indagan con sorna cómo marcha la investigación. Incluso si el Estado le ofreciera protección a testigos o confidentes, no podría garantizar su seguridad, dijo Salas.“La pondrían con la misma gente que mató a su hija”, recalcó ella.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Fort Worth: Endowment complete for Hulsey Chair in Episcopal Studies

first_imgFort Worth: Endowment complete for Hulsey Chair in Episcopal Studies [Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth press release] Brite Divinity School, located at Texas Christian University, and the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth have announced the completion of a $2.5 million endowment for a faculty chair: The Right Reverend Sam B. Hulsey Chair in Episcopal Studies.Hulsey is the retired bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northwest Texas. He and his wife, Isabelle, live in Fort Worth. The completion of the endowment of the Hulsey Chair was accomplished through gifts and pledges from 150 donors and finalized with a gift from Sylvia and Tim Stevens, members of St. Christopher Episcopal Church, Fort Worth, Texas.The organizing committee includes the Rev. Fred Barber, Anne Bass, Robert Crates, Adele Hart, the late Rev. Bert Honea, Jr., the Rev. Chris Jambor, the Rev. David Madison, the Rev. William Nix, Pat Schutts, and Shannon Worrell.Hulsey has a long and distinguished career in The Episcopal Church, which culminated in his tenure as bishop of the Diocese of Northwest Texas from 1980-1997. Prior to his election to the episcopate, Hulsey headed parishes in Corsicana, Pampa and Midland, as well as in Nashville, Tennessee. A Fort Worth native, Hulsey graduated with a Master of Divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary (1958). During his episcopacy, Hulsey chaired the planning committee of the House of Bishops and served on the boards of trustees of the Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest and the University of the South. Since his return to Fort Worth upon his retirement, Hulsey has held leadership positions in numerous civic organizations, including Tarrant County Historical Society, Alzheimer’s Association of North Texas, Meals-on-Wheels, Fort Worth Symphony, and Fort Worth Opera.Fort Worth Bishop Rayford B. High, Jr., said, “Episcopalians all over this diocese – indeed, all over The Episcopal Church – rejoice at this news. The Episcopal Church always has supported theological education. The Right Reverend Sam B. Hulsey Chair in Episcopal Studies honors a great man who not only is a fine bishop but also a humble Christian grounded in the love of Jesus Christ. Bishop Sam is a good friend to me and so many in the Church who turn to him regularly for pastoral guidance and mentoring. His scholarly mind, his loving gentle spirit, and his pastoral gifts offer an example to us all. I am so grateful to Sylvia and Tim Stevens for their wonderful gift that completed the endowment. I thank all the many generous donors who have made this possible.”The first faculty member to hold the chair is Ed Waggoner, who received his Ph.D. from Yale University. He also holds a Master of Arts in Religion from Yale Divinity School and a B.A. from Willamette University. Waggoner comes to Brite as a highly regarded teacher and a gifted systematic and constructive theologian. His wife, the Rev. Canon Janet Waggoner, is the canon to the ordinary in the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.For more information about Brite Divinity School and the Episcopal Studies program, contact Brite at 817-257-6646 or www.brite.edu.The full press release is available here. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Posted Feb 18, 2015 last_img read more

Archbishop Welby: Abuse victims must be heard

first_img Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Gavin DrakePosted Aug 12, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Archbishop of Canterbury, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Eventscenter_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC [Anglican Communion News Service] The silencing of abuse victims is itself a form of abuse “as bad if not worse than the first betrayal,” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said. The archbishop made his comments in a foreword to the current issue of Crucible, which bills itself as the journal of Christian social ethics. Its current issue focuses on safeguarding children and vulnerable adults.Full article. Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Archbishop Welby: Abuse victims must be heard Gender Justice Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

Preachers ponder their task in divided nation and, perhaps, divided…

first_img ron davin says: Pjcabbiness says: Dan Tootle says: Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags mike geibel says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 18, 2017 at 10:24 am “If people really know that you care about them, they’ll be much more likely to listen to you say things that are challenging,” she said.” That was my experience during 40 years in the pulpit. During the Vietnam War, which I opposed in and out of the pulpit, you could hear cars starting while I was still preaching! It was a congregation with many Navy officers and their families who did not agree with my anti-war stand. However, I would often be told at the church door, “Father Fred, I don’t believe a word of what you are saying, but I know you will take care of my family when I am overseas. That’s what matters to me.” I was always an activist but also a caring pastor. Some of those who opposed my stand on the war took the trouble, years later, to write and say that I had been right, the war was a disaster. April 17, 2017 at 4:07 pm When I was in seminary, we were taught to preach Jesus. Very good advice to today’s clergy who are tempted to stray off message. We are part of the Jesus Movement, which has been effectively going on for over 2,000 years. Most of the 2,000 years was without our preaching. If we preach Jesus, then the Holy Spirit has more room to work in a human heart. When a “preacher” starts down the political road in a sermon, I turn off my ears because I know strife and hurt feelings are just a word away. If we believe Jesus and we preach Jesus all is well with our souls and God’s Holy Spirit can change hearts. Angustia Hamasaki says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL April 17, 2017 at 4:02 pm This is a thoughtful, well written piece, in my opinion. I hope we all can pause for a moment and then reach out to one another to establish a true, respectful dialogue on these difficult and often contentious issues. April 20, 2017 at 10:51 am By the Grace of God. April 17, 2017 at 5:47 pm Those who wish to speak political speech in the pulpit need first to realized they are there through the generosity of the American taxpayer. We don’t pay excessive taxes so churches get by without paying taxes to support the nation, state or county. Preach all the religion you want but don’t cross the line. If you want to do that then start paying the taxes we all have to pay for any business. After all, when you come right down to it, a church is nothing more than a business in vestments.The episcopal church seems to be “hell bent” on causing as much dissent as possible and that church has little desire to bring two differing sides together. You find “them” at the drop of a miter yelling and screaming in the streets. Along with their so-called clergy. Sane and reasonable people don’t take to the streets and disrupt traffic, business, and all commerce in an attempt to force their opinions on others. This clearly obvious move on their part should have shown them this is not the way to effect change. When interviewed on TV most of these protestors can’t answer the simple question, “What are you Protesting?” They don’t have a clue and have nothing more than the desire to join a mob and in many cases they are paid for this. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 17, 2017 at 7:39 pm How did you ever get passed the last 8 years ? Sermons grounded in Scripture, especially the lectionary readings of the day, can be a faith community’s touchstone in times of division, say many preachers.[Episcopal News Service] The 2016 presidential election and the Trump administration have, depending on which pundits you listen to, exposed divides not so keenly seen in the United States since the Civil War or at least since protests wracked the country during the civil rights era and the Vietnam War.People who generally agree with the direction of the current administration frequently encounter others who decry that direction. The relentless pace of the news cycle with its one scandal or debatable decision after another can feel like a bombardment no matter one’s stance.Living a faithful life in the midst of such divisions is not easy. On Sunday morning, members of the same congregation come to church for different reasons. Some might seek respite from the debates raging around the country. Others might be seeking guidance or inspiration for their roles in the public square. Others might be bringing more intimate worries and joys to the nave.  What is a preacher to do?Preachers alone with their Bibles and textbooks have pondered the question and it has been the subject of small clergy gatherings, Facebook discussions and diocesan clergy gatherings, including recently in Maryland and Minnesota.“The gospel is inherently political but not American-partisan political,” says the Rev. Gary Manning, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThe Rev. Gary Manning, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, told Episcopal News Service, that knowing the congregation he faces is filled with all of those sorts of worshippers “tends to help me be a little more gentle,” Gentle, he said, but “not necessarily pulling punches.”Admitting to a tension most preachers feel at one time or another, Manning said, “Quite frankly sometimes I just want to get up and wail away, and I think for whose benefit is that? Is that just because I’ve got the pulpit and I can do that? Well, that’s not what I am called to do; get up and give voice to my own frustration.”The Rev. Bernard J. Owens, rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Greensboro, North Carolina, agreed. “The most pastoral and prophetic thing we can do is speak honestly and truthfully,” he said in an interview with ENS. “And I don’t entirely mean we need to be the prophet Amos every Sunday but rather to be authentic” and grounded in the truth of Scripture.Owens recently tried to debunk the notion that a sermon is “the moment in which a designated holy person tells us everything we need to know.” In “The Light of the World: Writing my first sermon for the age of Trump,” an opinion piece he wrote for the online magazine Slate, Owens wrote that preaching must be rooted in study, prayer and relationships.“A sermon is only one piece of the many-layered, lifelong process of building a community,” he wrote. “Even the most challenging events can also serve as opportunities to strengthen that community, but that requires equal measures of courage and humility.”The Rev. Bernard J. Owens, rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Greensboro, North Carolina, says that simply preaching about discord in politics is not what is called for. Photo courtesy of Bernard J. OwensOwens feels called to “build up a more sacred and loving community that really does include everyone within the congregation.” At the same time, he knows that “if we aren’t honoring that there’s some really upsetting things happening then we’re just ignoring it” and being inauthentic.Yet, it is a balancing act, he said. To preach only about current events can degrade the relationships a preacher has forged in a congregation. It also contributes to the sense of exhaustion many people on both sides of the communion rail feel about keeping track of all the issues and their responses. Moreover, such preaching can simply affirm the fact that people are divided.Besides, Manning said, it can backfire. “I think it’s important to tell the truth but I think it’s important to tell the truth in a way that people can hear it,” he said. “If you just use slogans, if you just use stuff that sounds like you’re recycling some political manifesto, people block up their ears pretty quickly to that.”Manning said it is one thing to show how the gospel critiques the latest political decision or policy. “It’s another thing to ask how are we as gospel people to embody our lives now. How are we to enact gospel witness?”Two preachers who teach the art of homiletics in Episcopal seminaries would agree.In the face of what she called “a huge energy asking us to be reactive,” the Rev. Linda Clader said, “my advice to preachers, and to myself, is to take a big breath and back up a step and really remember that our job is to preach the gospel.”The Rev. Linda Clader, professor emerita of homiletics at Church Divinity School of the Pacific, says preachers needs to be faithful to the day’s readings and the call to build Christian community in the face of a divided culture. Photo: Church Divinity School of the PacificClader, who is professor emerita of homiletics at Church Divinity School of the Pacific, told ENS that preachers must be diligent about starting with the readings for the day. “That doesn’t mean that you aren’t going to respond to something that is crazy enough but our job is to build community, to build a Christian community and it’s a community that’s grounded in the gospel,” she said.However, Clader said, preachers should not fall into the trap of pitting in their sermons what Donald Trump says against what Jesus says. Instead, preachers have to cast a larger vision of “justice, forgiveness and God’s love.”Grounding their sermons in that gospel message gives preachers authority, she said. “That’s the platform of authority that you can stand on because you have studied it and studied it, and you do know something about what it says and what it means,” she said.The Rev. Ruthanna Hooke, associate professor of homiletics at Virginia Theological Seminary, said it is easy for preachers to misuse the pulpit as their personal platforms. “So, Scripture becomes a kind of grounding that you have to keep submitting yourself to – to the claims of the text – so that you are staying in contact with God as the source of preaching.”Clader and Hooke both said that the text, in Hooke’s words, is a crucial touchstone. “But, having said that, the text pushes us into some pretty uncomfortable places,” Hooke added.The difference, in Manning’s words, it that “the gospel is inherently political but not American-partisan political.”Manning said he believes what he is called to do is to remind people that “it is our theology and our baptismal convent that forms our understanding of the world and not the other way around, and that’s hard for people because they’re exposed to the American story all week and maybe the gospel story for an hour.”The gospel, Hooke said, is indeed political in its implications and its applications, and the preacher’s challenge is to explicate it in a way that is “universally hear-able while at the same the time is really the gospel.”The Rev. Ruthanna Hooke, associate professor of homiletics at Virginia Theological Seminary, says Scripture must be the touchstone from which preachers humbly approach their task. Photo: Shawn Evelyn/Virginia Theological SeminaryHooke teaches her students that if they are going to preach a “political sermon,” they “really have to implicate themselves.” Preachers have to ask if they would do what they are asking of their listeners. “That’s an important measure of humility on the part of the preacher and helps with these very divisive questions,” she said, adding that outrage not followed by action does not lend itself to helping the community find solutions.It helps, she said, to remember that any given sermon is part of the preacher’s relationship with the community. “If people really know that you care about them, they’ll be much more likely to listen to you say things that are challenging,” she said.Diocese of Maryland Bishop Eugene Sutton harkened to that care in a February pastoral letter. He urged preachers, among other things, to witness to the gospel and acknowledge that there are other witnesses. Remind your listeners, he said, that you want to keep talking with them, and then show a willingness to listen, change your mind and repent if needed.“Show some courage,” Sutton said. “It’s easier in the long run for your pastoral ministry than cowardice.”The bishop asked listeners to show the same willingness to listen, change one’s mind and repent, but also to study the Sunday readings and acknowledge Jesus as “both a spiritual and a political teacher.”“Cut your preachers some slack,” Sutton said. “They really are trying to say and do the right thing.”And, Manning noted, they are doing it during the 12 or so minutes that most Episcopal preachers devote to the sermon.Hooke reminded preachers that the pulpit might not always be the best place from which to dive deeply into the issues of the day because the sermon is a monologue, not truly a conversation. It might be better, she said, to open up an issue while preaching and then host conversations at other times. The church, Manning and Hooke said, can be hospitable to difficult conversations among people with opposing viewpoints. Churches might be becoming one of the few places where non-like-minded people can gather for conversation, Hooke said.Being Christian in times like these means finding common ground and core values, says Presiding Bishop Michael Curry. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceWhether it is in the pulpit or during an adult education forum, the first step ought to be acknowledging that the divisions in the wider world exist within in a congregation. “It can be pastorally helpful to actually talk about something that everybody’s thinking about but afraid to voice,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry said during a recent news conference when a reporter asked him about the challenges of preaching to and leading congregations during this season of division.The next question, Curry said, is “how do you move forward and offer a word and help people navigate a context that is complex – morally complex?”As a parish priest and then as bishop of North Carolina, Curry said, he learned that calling people to stand on common ground helped give everyone some navigational tools.“I approached that by trying to first attempt to identify and articulate what are the core values reflected in the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, that we as followers of Jesus, as Christians, believe,” he said.“Claiming the space of the values and teachings of Jesus does not mean that we have all the answers to how to solve either the problem or the issue,” he warned. Rather, it means claiming the common ground at least for Christians and looking for people of other religious traditions and people with no religious traditions who nevertheless hold the same values.That approach allows for the fact that “everybody’s got something to contribute and we’ll come out with something better when we do that.”Curry gave some examples. How, he asked, might a study of the parable of the Good Samaritan inform the health-care debate? Christians know of Jesus’ so-called Golden Rule in Matthew 7:12 in which he tells his followers to do to others as they would have others do to them. “Now, if you are a legislator, you have to ask yourself the social policy question of is this decision something I would want somebody else to do to me,” Curry said.“To love your neighbor as yourself means not only to love the person whom the legislation was trying to help but it’s also about loving the person who disagrees with you,” he said. Republicans and Democrats must see each as neighbors, as defined by Jesus, “if you want to be a Christian,” he said.“The truth is we are not the Republican Party at prayer and we are not the Democratic Party at prayer,” Curry said. “We are the Jesus Movement and that makes a difference.”(Episcopalians can engage in policy discussions and advocacy at the federal level, and in some cases state level, by joining the Episcopal Public Policy Network.)– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is Episcopal News Service’s senior reporter/editor. The Rev. Gwin Hanahan says: Robert Browning says: Submit a Job Listing Comments (26) By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 17, 2017 Rector Belleville, IL April 18, 2017 at 10:21 am I am delighted to read your comments. While I thought this article was well written and well balanced, I have lately come to believe that I am the only Episcopalian conservative in the pews, and the only lawyer that supports President Trump. (I fully acknowledge that he and his administration have rough edges, but judging from the knee-jerk reactions I regularly hear from my more liberal colleagues and fellow parishioners, let alone some of the sermons I have heard since last November, I had begun to despair that in contemporary Episcopal interpretation of my Baptismal vow, being a Christian and a member of the Body of Christ necessarily means being socially liberal in civil politics.) To be sure, my faith informs my politics, and I am quick to criticize the President or any other Republican or any other conservative if his position is antithetical to my understanding of the Gospel; and I would want any preacher to explain why any government action is or is not consistent with Jesus’s teaching. But I am glad to understand, from what you say here, that there still is diversity of political opinion in our church. Thank you! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Jess Jaffe says: Submit a Press Release The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York F William Thewalt says: Featured Events Bill Louis says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Pjcabbiness says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC mike geibel says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA April 18, 2017 at 11:01 am Thank-you for this very relevant article. I am studying to be a Lay Preacher in the Diocese of Central New York and have too felt the pull between my personal convictions overshadowing my sermons. As preachers, we dive into scripture with our whole being, hoping that when we emerge, the Holy Spirit has given us the best exegesis of the reading possible. And that’s the point. The scriptures don’t require anything other than themselves to be revealed. They have stood on their own for 2000 years. The Word will, and has survived the best of times and the worst of times. Remember the two disciples on the road home to Emmaus on Resurrection Day? They heard the words spoken by the, “stranger,” and their, “hearts stirred.” May our words, preached at the pulpit, in sync with the Holy Spirit, stir hearts and transform lives. God is still God; and God changes hearts for God’s purpose no matter which side of of the political spectrum we find ourselves. And that is all good. Peace to All Featured Jobs & Calls Warren Eckels says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 18, 2017 at 2:16 am Actually, sometimes obeying God, loving God with heart, mind and soul and loving your neighbor as yourself means putting yourself in opposition to injustice. If we allow ourselves to be vexed by wrath, to be first to judge and condemn, to hold ourselves inherently better than our political opponents, then even if we triumph politically, the triumph will be hollow and simply plant the seeds for the next Trump. Joseph Pagano says: April 30, 2017 at 11:36 am Nowhere in the article did I hear the very large truth, We need the Trumpers’ pledge dollars. I would have a whole lot more respect for this branch of the Church if I saw an acknowledgement of this fact of life. As for the many, many people in the church who feel as I do, that this is not rocket science; when you re trying to throw 24 million off healthcare, when you empower a police force to rip people from their beds and their schools, when you label the free press an enemy and make statements not based in fact or reality, when you try to destroy many departments of government you have been entrusted to uphold, when you fuel and stoke the flames of white supremacy — this is Evil. To those clear-sighted people, I ask a question, if your national leadership refuses to call out Evil, are you not being “complicit” giving your time treasure and talents to something that tries to swing both ways? Yes, there are Blue State dioceses that have called out Trump, but from the Red States, the silence has been deafening — just as with the national leadership. Do you really want to be a support to such a group? I personally voted with my feet. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem May 1, 2017 at 1:27 pm Mr. Eckels, You obviously did not get the message being presented by Bishop Curry… By using a phrase such as, …”simply plant the seeds for the next Trump.”, you alienate any Trump supporters that are reading your message and set up conflict that leads to hurt feelings and discord.“Republicans and Democrats must see each as neighbors, as defined by Jesus, “if you want to be a Christian,… The truth is we are not the Republican Party at prayer and we are not the Democratic Party at prayer,” Curry said. “We are the Jesus Movement and that makes a difference.” May 6, 2017 at 8:38 am Finally, we have someone willing to stand up against evil and walk out of the EC for its hypocrisy in accepting pledge money from Trump supporters. I think you should persuade all your friends who think just like you do to follow your lead and vow never to return until every Episcopal Church adopts a “zero tolerance” policy against anyone who refuses to pledge allegiance to “resistance” rather than to “peace” and reconciliation. To regain its soul, the TEC must publically denounce Trump and stop accepting this tainted blood money from Trump supporters and expel them from the pews. After all, this is war—the evil empire verses the dark side. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska April 19, 2017 at 11:47 am I meant to add that I am a Korean war vet, went back to university with Gi Bill and went to Nashotah House Seminary because in between High school, 4 yrs. military and during college years I apprenticed as a carpenter/builder. My bishop, Hart, Diocese of PA, even though Diocese was historically “Low Church”, as Pres. of CPF, he was able to get me into Nashotah, if I could finish building needed 25 student housing units. Which I did. There I served as Deputy Sheriff, carpenter and other construction during those 3 years. I then rebuilt a parish in down trodden section of Phila. I then built a parish in Florida staying there over 30 years. I am a life long conservative Republican, BUT I vote on issues and what I believe in the candidate. I try to separate people and issues into: CAN’T and WON’T. The Can’t’s I help with all my being. It is tough to sometimes distinguish. I am an optimist and Hope springs eternal.Bless us all as we believe that church is a hospital for sinners and not a museum for saints. Evangelism is: one Beggar telling another Beggar where the BREAD is! Come to the Table! Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC April 19, 2017 at 12:47 pm Mike Geibel makes many excellent points with which I am in full agreement. If the Episcopal Church is not yet in my own “rear-view mirror” it is simply because I do not like the idea of being driven out of the church by the growing mob of left-wing dissenters and their increasingly bizarre views. Of the many increasingly acceptable opinions within the Episcopal Church, perhaps the most grotesque is the notion that so-called transgendered people should have the right to “change” themselves even to the point of mutilating their own bodies. What this amounts to is telling our divine creator that he made some kind of a “gender assignment” mistake which we human beings have a (God-given?) right to correct. Surely this amounts to plain lunacy and I feel sympathy for those priests and bishops who remain loyal to historic religious common sense but are forced to get along with those of their non-traditionalist brethren who in reality are the true dissenters. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Kilty Maoris says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ April 19, 2017 at 6:24 am The whole discussion is confused. To articulate a coherent position one would need to (at a minimum) answer the following questions:1. What do you mean by politics? Are you drawing on a tradition of political discourse that flows from Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rouseau, Habermas or some other political theorist?2. What do you mean when you say “Jesus was political?” How so? In what ways? Is there a political theory to be found in the Gospels? Or are you teasing out hints and tendencies?3. Which “Jesus” are you referring to? The so-called historical Jesus? If so, then you have to engage all the questions that go into that contested area of discourse? If not, is it the Jesus we meet in Matthew’s version of the Sermon on the Mount? In the final form of Mark? Luke? John?4. What is a sermon? What is the meaning and purpose of a sermon in the context of worship?One can answer these questions in a variety of ways (there are volumes written on these subjects), but one needs to answer them. Without answers to these questions the discussion is confused and the assertions made by the participants lack clarity and coherence. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Preachers ponder their task in divided nation and, perhaps, divided congregations Scripture, relationships and common ground seen as sermons’ anchors Gretchen Lipp says: April 18, 2017 at 11:31 am Entering most Episcopal Churches, one is aware most keenly that the center of our worship is the altar, not the pulpit. Seven to twelve minute-sermons come from prayer, attention to the Holy Spirit, study, and they shed light on the day’s Readings, most often the Gospel. Condensing many hours of preparation into those 7-12 minutes is a discipline that provides the hearers with an historical, literary, etc. criticism in a space so that the hearers may be informed by the Holy Spirit, not by a preacher’s opinion. Preach Jesus; let the Spirit work; respect the parishioners’ ability to think within the via media. Allow space in our sermons for all of this to happen. Trust God who gave us all intelligence. All of this in 7-12 minutes. Then comes the central part of our service, the center of our worship: not the pulpit and the priest but God’s Table and the Holy Spirit. Tony Oberdorfer says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 18, 2017 at 4:33 am Different people have different ideas of what it means to act in a Christian way. the members of my parish tend toward the conservative, though we have many liberals. We are a parish that has a tradition of doing. We sponsor a youth center with after school programs in a low income city a few miles from our church, a well child clinic, three sober living houses for recovering addicts and a food bank among other ministries. We are also gone to an Asian Outreach ministry and a prison ministry. I am told the more liberal parish has lots of committees that write letters. We have had stormy controversies but it is by emphasizing what we have inCommon that we have survived. The evil of going down the political road is this: we begin to see each other as Republicans or Democrats rather than as Christians. Shortly after the election one of our deacons preached a very political sermon in which she implied, To a parish full of people who voted for Trump, that people who voted for Trump posed an actual physical danger to those right minded people who didn’t. She was actually shocked to learn that she had offended people who came to church regularly, who participated in and donated to the ministries we have to the poor, who had always been kind and generous to her. I was one of those offended. The problem is that, as others have observed, we conservatives tend to think that liberals are mistaken and misguided. Too many liberals think that conservatives are just evil and selfish and full of hate. It’s hard to have a meaningful dialog when the other side thinks you are evil. And, as a lawyer, I know full well that Justice is too often in the eye of the beholder. There are at least two sides to every contentious issue. You may think the U S was evil in dropping the atomic bomb. Those of your parishioners who were once soldiers who were being shipped to the Pacific for the invasion of Japan, and their descendants may beg to differ. They are alive today because that bomb was dropped. At least that’s how they see it. In fact that exact scenario happened in my parish when our then priest had the custom of preaching against the atom bomb every August. He stopped after I pointed out how many of his parishioners had served in WWII or were the children or grandchildren of those who did. I have already made this comment too long but that’s really the point. These are complex issues that don’t lend themselves to 12 minute sermons This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET April 17, 2017 at 8:38 pm There are at least 2 kinds of churches. Pulpit centered and Altar centered. Pulpit centered, you come to hear what preacher has to say. If it is not what you anticipate or buy into, you may go away with less than you came with.In Altar centered church you come to offer up all your sins and the preacher is one of the ones there to do the same, along with usher, acolyte, Lay Reader, etc.At birth we are like a tabla rossa with a clean slate. Our sins get tacked up onto this. We put these sins and thumb tacks into the offering plate and Confession. Thumb tack holes remain. Holy Communion fills up the holes on our tabla rossa and we again are off to a new start – Go Forth!You are part of the Body of Christ; not the leader of a Bible Study or politician running for office. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY April 20, 2017 at 1:17 pm I have no training in political science, and I am not a Biblical scholar, but I am not persuaded that Jesus was political. Others more qualified say Jesus was political, and probably they know better than I do, but I wonder if they say this merely to justify their political activism as “God’s work.” I do, however, believe that the execution of Jesus Christ by the Roman state was politically motivated. I also attribute the demise of the Episcopal Church to its political activism, at least in part. The difference is that the demise of the Church is largely self-inflicted. My exit from the Church is of no consequence. I read an article on the declining membership of the TEC which commented that liberal-minded millennials are not flocking to the Episcopal Church as predicted by the former Bishop, and that most of the members still attending services are “geezers” like myself who do so “out of habit” and a desire to preserve their funeral in the church of their birth. We “geezers” are hardly a reliable stream of revenue into the future, and political activism is a thirsty beast. Rumors that the TEC and ACLU are engaged in merger negotiations are sarcastic punch-lines by those who are angry and gloat over the continuing nose-dive in membership, but concerns of fiscal sustainability are a reality and seem to be forcing a shift from “ministry” for an aging membership, to sales of church property and investments in business ventures. The ENS published trial reports of Bishop Bruno closing St. James in Newport Beach so he could sell the sanctuary for $15 million to a real estate developer to pay legal fees and invest the money in revenue producing property. The ashes of former members interned at the church would be respectfully relocated. The LA Diocese has declared itself a “sanctuary diocese” and approved a budget that includes $1.5 million for immigrants and refugees, this at the same time that the loyal members were locked out of the sanctuary at St. James so it could be destroyed and replaced with luxury condominiums. It is ironic that many of the Churches owned by the diocese are similarly located on very valuable property and could be quickly converted to cash under Trump’s agenda designed to spur private development. With the current political vitriol spewed nightly by media hacks (on both sides) and the controversial and divisive actions advocated by the Leadership, local pastors who are honestly and faithfully trying to “Preach the Word” as engraved on the pulpit featured below the title of the article are faced with a difficult task. April 18, 2017 at 5:04 am Thanks be to God, that I’m Christian Episcopalian hope worthy to be called Christian. God bless us all. Don’t look to our sins Lord but your love and mercy to help us grow with humility, goodness, kindness as worthy servants and children of yours, that we may all respect all your creations. Through Jesus our loving savior name we pray. Amen Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN April 18, 2017 at 5:07 pm A thoughtful article on the predicament now facing pastors—but I get the impression that the real question the article tries to address, is: “How to give a sermon denouncing Trump without offending and losing conservative parishioners.” My advice is: Don’t do it. Joining the chorus of nightly media pundits who hate Trump more than they love America will alienate those members who disagree with you. I agree with the comments of Robert Browning and Rev. Hanahan distinguishing between a “pulpit” and an “altar” church. Ministering to the spiritual needs of church members in their daily lives is a full time job without the politics. I don’t go to Church to hear a lecture on some controversial issue or to listen to others engage in political debates. I seek guidance on how I should live my life and be a better person, and not on who or what I should vote for. The implicit message of any sermon advocating a political position or indirectly endorsing a political candidate is that if you don’t agree with the pastor, “you are a bad person.”I doubt the theories offered on the “art” of giving homilies with political messages will actually work in practice. Parishioners are not stupid. They will recognize a political message advocating universal health care even if disguised as the story of the Good Samaritan. And the story doesn’t answer the question: “How much does it cost and who is going to pay for it?”Missing from the article are interviews with pastors who have personally witnessed the resulting friction between members, empty pews, and declining pledge monies. Also missing from the article is an honest disclosure of the negative statistical and fiscal impact of Episcopal political activism following the election of President Trump. I therefore find the comments posted by actual front-line pastors to be more persuasive. I left the Episcopal Church because of the political posturing by the Leadership and not because of my Pastor— we may have disagreed on politics but I respected her as a compassionate and spiritual leader. The ENS has published many post-election articles on bishops signing opposition statements to Executive Orders, amicus curie legal briefs on transgender rights, declarations of a sanctuary diocese, and participation in protest marches on everything from oil pipelines to abortion rights. I wish the article had disclosed the number of pastors who have reported loss of members, declining attendance and that their church must largely pay its mission share not from pledges, but by renting church property to private businesses and holding fundraisers open to non-members. Examples of real life consequences are a better measure of what not to do than rhetorical theory. My perception is that the leadership has aligned itself with the same politics that have eliminated God from school, and members of the clergy have walked arm in arm with anarchists advocating violence and atheist college professors who indoctrinate students on political correctness, label those who disagree as deplorable, hillbilly racists, decry capitalism as evil, and consider Jesus Christ to be a fairy tale for the weak-minded. For me, the Church leadership has made the term “Jesus Movement” a synonym for activist preachers advocating leftist ideology.There are many members who are quite orthodox in their Christian faith, who are fiscally conservative, who respect our Nation’s laws, and yet support some (but not all) liberal causes. I was such a cradle Episcopalian. The Episcopal Church is now in my rear-view mirror. April 17, 2017 at 5:24 pm Then you are ignoring the Jesus who spoke and acted against the political and religious authorities of his time (and who also subsequently killed him). To preach Jesus is not just to love your God with all your heart, mind, and soul and to love your neighbor as you love yourself. It is also the recognize, speak against, and to act to eliminate injustice. Your comment alludes to such action as being “political”. What it is is to preach Jesus as a matter of speaking truth to power, no matter whether that applies to political or religious power. Ted Foley says: Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: April 19, 2017 at 12:02 pm I picked up this article a few days late. I found the tone of the comments to be very telling.I wonder if it would be helpful, in any discussion such as this, to avoid labels such as “conservative”, or “liberal” or the many other labels used to sub-divide us? Quite frankly, I sometimes wonder if we all mean the same thing when we are using the same labels.Would it be helpful instead to talk about specific issues and look at them through the lens of scripture? Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Faith & Politics Rector Collierville, TN James Saunders says: April 20, 2017 at 12:37 pm If you don’t like what’s going on with your church then stop putting your contributions into the general fund. The diocese feeds off every church under its jurisdiction with what is called an accessment. Choke off the dollars that flow to up them and they will start to listen. Give your donations to local outreach or a designated fund that improves your church building. Get creative but keep it out of the General fund. It’s not an easy thing to do. When your church leadership discovers what you are trying to do you will get some diapproving looks and plenty of pushback depending where they stand with the issues you don’t agree with. For a real view of what is going on with the higher Episcopal Church search out the last budget approved by the convention. April 18, 2017 at 8:41 pm I thought that I was possibly the last conservative Episcopalian. I am pleased to see that there are others. I will not give up on the Episcopal Church. I guess I am either a glutton for punishment or a modern day Don Quixote type. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Paul A Fessenden says: Susan Salisbury says: Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. April 18, 2017 at 3:41 pm James Saunders speaks well for the many of us Episcopalians of long standing who feel marginalized by the “contemporary Episcopalian interpretation of Baptismal vows.” I am not a pariah because I voted against Hillary Clinton. What ever happened to the third leg of the Episcopal stool called “reason?” Reason is the last thing on the mind of those who self-assuredly “know” they are right. Sermons with a good dose of reason are always well received. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Robert Browning says: mike geibel says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more