BSE closes points 1605 down on April 7

first_imgNew Delhi, April 7 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 16.05 points down to stand at 22,343.45. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed up 0.70 points up to stand at6, 695.05. Suzlon Energy and Strides Arco were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 12.40% and 8.02% along with Jaiprakash Associates and GMR Infrastructure with an increase of 5.40% and 5.38% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Jindal Steel and Future Retail with a decrease of 5.93% and 5.46% along with Prestige Estates and Crompton Greaves with a decrease of 4.90% and 3.72% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 13.96 points at 13,264.91 while the banking sector is down 56.91 points at 14,305.35 and the realty sector is down 20.89 points at 1,505.71. The Indian currency is down 0.17% at Rs 60.19 per dollar.last_img read more

HP Inc says to accelerate job cuts by 2016

first_imgHP Inc said it was accelerating its restructuring programme and now expects about 3,000 people will exit by the end of fiscal 2016 instead of over three years as it announced in September.Then, Hewlett-Packard Co had said it expected to cut about 33,300 jobs over three years, of which up to 3,300 were to be cut in HP Inc. It said then that 1,200 people would leave the company by the end of 2016.The restructuring will result in charges and associated cash payments of about $300 million in the current year, the company said.”This move is basically HP Inc embracing the tough pricing environment and shifting their focus to building their portfolio,” says Shannon Cross, an analyst for Cross Research.HP Inc, which houses former Hewlett-Packard Co’s legacy hardware business, reported a near 12 percent drop in quarterly revenue, as it struggles with weak demand for PCs and printers.Revenue in the company’s personal systems business fell 13 percent in the first quarter ended Jan. 31, while it declined 17 percent in its printing division from a year earlier.PC sales have been falling sharply worldwide, and the launch of Windows 10 has so far failed to rekindle demand.Printer demand has been hurt as corporate customers cut printing costs and consumers shift to mobile devices.The company, which is reporting results independently for the first time since being spun off from Hewlett-Packard Co, forecast adjusted profit of 35-40 cents per share for its second quarter ending April 30.Analysts on average were expecting 39 cents, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.HP Inc maintained its 2016 adjusted profit forecast at $1.59-$1.69 per share.The company’s earnings from continuing operations fell to $650 million, or 36 cents per share, in the first quarter from $770 million, or 41 cents per share, a year earlier.Revenue fell to $12.25 billion from $13.86 billion.Analysts on average had expected earnings of 36 cents per share and revenue of $12.20 billion.HP Inc’s shares were marginally lower at $10.75 in extended trading on Wednesday. They had fallen more than 13 percent since the spinoff in early November to Wednesday.Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Co, also spun off from Hewlett-Packard Co, is expected to report results on March 3.last_img read more

Data shows fewer tornado days in US but more per event over

first_img Tornados happen in many places, but because of its unique geography, the U.S. has more than any other country—mainly due to the lack of a large mountain dividing east and west. There has been speculation recently, that global warming is causing more tornados to occur—though it has also been suggested it only seems that way because of how quickly information about tornadic events disseminates in the modern era. The trio at NOAA decided to let hard facts tell the story. They collected weather data from the national storm database, which goes back to 1954, to see if they could coax out any patterns (they only included tornados at least as strong as an F1).As it turns out, the trio did find a pattern, they say the data shows very clearly that the U.S. actually has a trend of having fewer days in which there is a tornado over the past two decades—that’s the good news. The bad news is that on days when there is a tornado, there are more than there used to be. The data shows that back in the 1970’s there were just .6 days a year that had 30 or more tornados—after the turn of the century, that number had risen to 3 days per year. Curiously, the numbers suggest that the country still experiences on average, the same number of tornadoes each year, approximately 1,200—they’re just spread out differently. They also noted that the beginning and end of the tornado “season” in recent years has fluctuated more wildly than the years prior to that.The researchers cannot say of course why the spread of tornados has changed in the U.S., though some might suggest it’s due to global warming or even changes in atmospheric conditions in parts of the country due to pollution or other unknown factors. What is clear, is that something is causing a change, and there is now evidence of it, providing a path for moving forward for better understanding what is really going on. Magazine reporting below average numbers of tornados in 2013 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Image: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, via Wikimedia Journal information: Science More information: Science 17 October 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6207 pp. 349-352. DOI: 10.1126/science.1257460center_img © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Data shows fewer tornado days in U.S. but more per event over past couple decades (2014, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-tornado-days-event-couple-decades.html Explore further A trio of researches with the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that though there are fewer total days per year when tornados occur in the U.S., the number that occur on days when there are tornados has increased over the past couple of decades. In their paper published in the journal Science, Harold Brooks, Gregory Carbin and Patrick Marsh describe how they studied weather data over the past half century and what they found when looking for trends.last_img read more