Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Top Stories Added Shipley, “We got a pretty solid grasp of it, though. We’ve been in it two weeks now. Football is football at the end of the day. I mean there’s only so many plays you can run. It’s just different terminology, different ways to do things, different formations (and) different motions just trying to get the right matchups.”The NFL allows teams with a new head coach to hold a bonus voluntary mini-camp, and for the Cardinals that is this week. The team will be on the field again Wednesday and Thursday.Wilks and his staff want to see just how much the players are able to retain and how well they transfer the class work to the on-field work.“We’re learning every day. We’re learning as coaches, we’re learning as players,” he said. “Most importantly around here, I’m just trying to figure out exactly what gets them in the right position, moving in the right direction. Again, it’s learning each individual. Most importantly, it’s trying to set the tempo and the vision as the head coach and get those guys to continue to buy in, which they are.”Quarterback watchAs expected, quarterback Sam Bradford was more spectator than active participant on Day 1. He had his helmet on and joined his teammates for the stretch, but he did not attempt a pass or appear to hand the ball off during the 20-minute media availability. 4 Comments   Share   “Guys got to be able to take care of their body and we’re trying to help them do that and trying to get those guys prepared and ready for practice,” Wilks said.And the music?“Some people may see it as a distraction,” Wilks continued, “I think it’s a level of getting guys to concentrate, when you start talking about crowd noise and those kinds of things like that, and it also allows the coaches to be able to let the players play.”Yes, things are different under Wilks.Of course, the biggest adjustment for the players is the playbook.Wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald likened this offseason — which on Tuesday moved to Phase Two with on-field workouts, minus contact — to being back in college. He spent the weekend and the night before studying.There are some similarities to Wilks’ offense compared to Arians, but the terminology is completely different, according to Fitzgerald.“They’re some words that are the same but they mean completely different. So that’s really confusing when you run to the line and you think, ‘Flounder’. Oh, no. Shoot. That’s not that route. I got to run this one. Stuff like that,” he said. “I’m just trying to make it be fast recall so I can go out there and play fast and execute.” The Cardinals are being cautious with Bradford, who was limited to just two games last season because of a knee injury.“He did some things during walk-through, which I thought looked pretty good. He went with the 1s, doing a few things there so we’re going to continue to progress and move forward with his progress,” Wilks said.Not limited was running back David Johnson. He, too, is coming off an injury but he looked every bit as good as he was two years ago according to his teammates.“I don’t think you can put into words or put into perspective how good David is and what he means to this offense — what he means to any offense, he’s that good of a player,” Shipley said. “Having him back is going to be huge; having him fresh is going to be even better.”Fitzgerald mentioned Johnson’s return as well, and also highlighted some of the other talent, the young talent, on offense in running back T.J. Logan and tight end Ricky Seals-Jones.“He’s got his burst and he’s working his tail off to get himself in shape and get ready. That was fun to see him,” Fitzgerald said, referring to Logan who missed all of 2017 due to a dislocated wrist. “Ricky Seals is making plays out there. He flashed a lot today, too. We got some young, exciting guys so I’m looking forward to it.”center_img EXTRA POINTS— A handful of players were spotted working out on the side. Those were tight end Jermaine Gresham (Achilles), defensive end Markus Golden (ACL), left tackle D.J. Humphries (knee) and defensive tackle Olsen Pierre (unknown).“I’m not going to be in a position to put a timetable on any of the players,” Wilks said. “I have tremendous respect for Tom (Reed, head athletic trainer) and his crew in there as well as Buddy, and those guys are doing a tremendous job in getting those guys moving forward.”— Approaching his 15th season in the NFL, Fitzgerald will be 35 when Week 1 arrives. Those are just numbers to him.“I’m as motivated as I was when I was 20 when I was just cutting my teeth. It doesn’t really turn off—that’s a good and a bad thing,” he said. “I’m probably going to struggle when I’m done with it.”— Asked about the Los Angeles Rams adding Ndamukong Suh to what was already a star-studded defense, Shipley feigned excitement.“Can’t wait,” he said, drawing laughter. “Their defensive line was good and it just got better.” The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling TEMPE, Ariz. – The difference was noticed immediately.Music, specifically Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise” was playing on large portable speakers. A country song followed.“That wasn’t me. I think that country song right there was A.Q.,” Arizona Cardinals head coach Steve Wilks said, smiling, referring to center A.Q. Shipley.With the music blasting, the players — led by strength and conditioning coach Buddy Morris — got loose for practice. That’s right; team stretch is back, something not seen the last five years during Bruce Arians’ tenure. Arizona Cardinals NFL football team president Michael Bidwill, left, and head coach Steve Wilks watch their team run drills during a voluntary team activity Tuesday, April 17, 2018, at the Cardinals’ training facility in Tempe, Ariz.(AP Photo/Matt York)last_img read more

Why 536 was the worst year to be alive

first_img By Ann GibbonsNov. 15, 2018 , 2:00 PM 640 After declining in the mid-500s, a surge in atmo – spheric lead signals an increase in silver mining because of economic recovery. (GRAPHIC) A. CUADRA/SCIENCE; (DATA) C. P. LOVELUCK ET AL., ANTIQUITY 2018; M. SIGL ET AL., NATURE 2015; M. MCCORMICK NICOLE SPAULDING/CCI FROM C. P. LOVELUCK ET AL., ANTIQUITY 10.15184, 4, 2018 530 530 550 536–545 Coldest decade on record in 2000 years. Crops fail in Ireland, Scandinavia, Mesopotamia, and China. Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’ 536 Icelandic volcano erupts, dimming the sun for 18 months, records say. Summer temperatures drop by 1.5°C to 2.5°C. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) 640 650 660 540 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 NICOLE SPAULDING/CCI FROM C. P. LOVELUCK ET AL., ANTIQUITY 10.15184, 4, 2018 An 72-meter ice core drilled in the Colle Gnifetti Glacier in the Swiss Alps entombs more than 2000 years of fallout from volcanoes,  storms, and human pollution.center_img Darkest hours and then a dawn A high-resolution ice core record combined with historical texts chronicles the impact of natural disasters on European society. 540–541 Second volcanic eruption. Summer temperatures drop again by 1.4°C–2.7°C in Europe. To Kyle Harper, provost and a medieval and Roman historian at The University of Oklahoma in Norman, the detailed log of natural disasters and human pollution frozen into the ice “give us a new kind of record for understanding the concatenation of human and natural causes that led to the fall of the Roman Empire—and the earliest stirrings of this new medieval economy.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Slivers from a Swiss ice core held chemical clues to natural and humanmade events. Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he’s got an answer: “536.” Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, “It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year,” says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.A mysterious fog plunged Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia into darkness, day and night—for 18 months. “For the sun gave forth its light without brightness, like the moon, during the whole year,” wrote Byzantine historian Procopius. Temperatures in the summer of 536 fell 1.5°C to 2.5°C, initiating the coldest decade in the past 2300 years. Snow fell that summer in China; crops failed; people starved. The Irish chronicles record “a failure of bread from the years 536–539.” Then, in 541, bubonic plague struck the Roman port of Pelusium, in Egypt. What came to be called the Plague of Justinian spread rapidly, wiping out one-third to one-half of the population of the eastern Roman Empire and hastening its collapse, McCormick says.Historians have long known that the middle of the sixth century was a dark hour in what used to be called the Dark Ages, but the source of the mysterious clouds has long been a puzzle. Now, an ultraprecise analysis of ice from a Swiss glacier by a team led by McCormick and glaciologist Paul Mayewski at the Climate Change Institute of The University of Maine (UM) in Orono has fingered a culprit. At a workshop at Harvard this week, the team reported that a cataclysmic volcanic eruption in Iceland spewed ash across the Northern Hemisphere early in 536. Two other massive eruptions followed, in 540 and 547. The repeated blows, followed by plague, plunged Europe into economic stagnation that lasted until 640, when another signal in the ice—a spike in airborne lead—marks a resurgence of silver mining, as the team reports in Antiquity this week. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country 541–543 The “Justinian” bubonic plague spreads through the Mediterranean, killing 35%–55% of the population and speeding the collapse of the eastern Roman Empire. Ever since tree ring studies in the 1990s suggested the summers around the year 540 were unusually cold, researchers have hunted for the cause. Three years ago polar ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica yielded a clue. When a volcano erupts, it spews sulfur, bismuth, and other substances high into the atmosphere, where they form an aerosol veil that reflects the sun’s light back into space, cooling the planet. By matching the ice record of these chemical traces with tree ring records of climate, a team led by Michael Sigl, now of the University of Bern, found that nearly every unusually cold summer over the past 2500 years was preceded by a volcanic eruption. A massive eruption—perhaps in North America, the team suggested—stood out in late 535 or early 536; another followed in 540. Sigl’s team concluded that the double blow explained the prolonged dark and cold.Mayewski and his interdisciplinary team decided to look for the same eruptions in an ice core drilled in 2013 in the Colle Gnifetti Glacier in the Swiss Alps. The 72-meter-long core entombs more than 2000 years of fallout from volcanoes, Saharan dust storms, and human activities smack in the center of Europe. The team deciphered this record using a new ultra–high-resolution method, in which a laser carves 120-micron slivers of ice, representing just a few days or weeks of snowfall, along the length of the core. Each of the samples—some 50,000 from each meter of the core—is analyzed for about a dozen elements. The approach enabled the team to pinpoint storms, volcanic eruptions, and lead pollution down to the month or even less, going back 2000 years, says UM volcanologist Andrei Kurbatov. 660 A second lead peak reflects silver mining, proba – bly at Melle, France, tied to a switch from gold to silver for coins and the beginnings of the medieval economy. In ice from the spring of 536, UM graduate student Laura Hartman found two microscopic particles of volcanic glass. By bombarding the shards with x-rays to determine their chemical fingerprint, she and Kurbatov found that they closely matched glass particles found earlier in lakes and peat bogs in Europe and in a Greenland ice core. Those particles in turn resembled volcanic rocks from Iceland. The chemical similarities convince geoscientist David Lowe of The University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand, who says the particles in the Swiss ice core likely came from the same Icelandic volcano. But Sigl says more evidence is needed to convince him that the eruption was in Iceland rather than North America.Either way, the winds and weather systems in 536 must have been just right to guide the eruption plume southeast across Europe and, later, into Asia, casting a chilly pall as the volcanic fog “rolled through,” Kurbatov says. The next step is to try to find more particles from this volcano in lakes in Europe and Iceland, in order to confirm its location in Iceland and tease out why it was so devastating.A century later, after several more eruptions, the ice record signals better news: the lead spike in 640. Silver was smelted from lead ore, so the lead is a sign that the precious metal was in demand in an economy rebounding from the blow a century before, says archaeologist Christopher Loveluck of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom. A second lead peak, in 660, marks a major infusion of silver into the emergent medieval economy. It suggests gold had become scarce as trade increased, forcing a shift to silver as the monetary standard, Loveluck and his colleagues write in Antiquity. “It shows the rise of the merchant class for the first time,” he says.Still later, the ice is a window into another dark period. Lead vanished from the air during the Black Death from 1349 to 1353, revealing an economy that had again ground to a halt. “We’ve entered a new era with this ability to integrate ultra–high-resolution environmental records with similarly high resolution historical records,” Loveluck says. “It’s a real game changer.”last_img read more