Gold Imports to Rise Premiums may Double Ahead of Diwali

first_imgAccording to bullion traders, India’s monthly gold imports are set to rise by as much as 50% from the current levels and premiums could also double ahead of this festive season next month. Additionally, gold sales are expected to rise by 15 to 20%.Currently, gold is being sold for around ₹27,000 per ten gram. It is expected that Indian gold buyers would help support global bullion prices which had dipped to eight-and-a-half month low of ₹1,216.01 (₹74,072) per 30 grams amid worries of hike in US interest rates. The festive demands are expected to push local gold prices. Prithiviraj Kothari, vice-president of the India Bullion & Jewellers’ Association expects the gold price to touch ₹28,500 per ten gram ahead of Hindu festivals like Dhanteras and Diwali.”Gold imports are expected to rise to about 70-75 tonnes per month in the coming months as against a monthly average of 50-60 tonnes,” Reuters quoted Prithviraj Kothari, vice-president of the India Bullion & Jewellers’ Association.After and during the Indian festive season, Indian gold premiums to the global benchmark are also expected to surge by ₹731 to ₹912 for 30 grams, from the current rate of ₹426 to ₹609 an ounce.Gold reached its highest at ₹35,074 per ten gram in August 2013, but then onwards the bullion prices have slipped steadily aided by weak prices overseas and a strengthening rupee.Deficit worries?Heavy imports raised the fiscal deficit during previous year that had put the rupee under pressure and slowed growth. Following this, UPA finance minister P. Chidambaram raised the import tax on gold for the third time in a year.However, in May 2014, RBI eased import restrictions on this commodity. The central bank permitted private agencies and banks to provide gold loans to the sector. But, the government has not lowered the import duty which is at 10%.India’s investment demand for gold slumped 67% on year in the June quarter, according to World Gold Council.But, Kothari opined that India’s deficit would not hurt because of gold demand during festive season as government’s restrictions on gold imports and lower international prices will prevent the deficit.last_img read more

Measuring metabolism in dolphins to calculate their caloric needs

first_img © 2018 Phys.org Virus cause of more than 170 dolphin deaths in Brazil Explore further Climate change is expected to have an impact on wildlife across the globe. As temperatures creep upward, researchers study various species to better understand how this might affect them. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn more about the food intake needs of bottlenose dolphins living off the coast of Florida in Sarasota Bay.To understand how much food a wild dolphin requires to live, the team looked at ocean temperatures, various states of dolphin activity and most particularly at the dolphins themselves. They noted that dolphins, like other mammals, require energy to fuel brain activity and to keep up with busy muscles—and also to keep warm. Because of this, they require different amounts of food depending on how active they are and how cold the water is.To calculate the caloric needs of the dolphins, the researchers started with data from prior studies, which have shown that the daily metabolic rate for many species averages out to approximately three to six times that of their resting rate. For the dolphins, that meant capturing several specimens and measuring their metabolic rate while they were kept at rest and then multiplying by three to six to get their average rates.The team reports that they found that the dolphins under study (with an average weight of 200 kg) required approximately 16,500 to 33,000 calories each day, which they further note translated to approximately 10 to 25 kg of fish each day. As part of the study, the group also tested lung function in the dolphins, which has been found to be a marker of environmental health in marine species.The researchers suggest studies like theirs will help with conservation efforts as the planet changes—if dolphins begin to require less food, for example, due to warmer water, that could lead to an increase in fish populations. More information: A. Fahlman et al. Field energetics and lung function in wild bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus , in Sarasota Bay Florida, Royal Society Open Science (2018). DOI: 10.1098/rsos.171280AbstractWe measured respiratory flow rates, and expired O2 in 32 (2–34 years, body mass [Mb] range: 73–291 kg) common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) during voluntary breaths on land or in water (between 2014 and 2017). The data were used to measure the resting O2 consumption rate (V˙O2V˙O2, range: 0.76–9.45 ml O2 min−1 kg−1) and tidal volume (VT, range: 2.2–10.4 l) during rest. For adult dolphins, the resting VT, but not V˙O2V˙O2, correlated with body mass (Mb, range: 141–291 kg) with an allometric mass-exponent of 0.41. These data suggest that the mass-specific VT of larger dolphins decreases considerably more than that of terrestrial mammals (mass-exponent: 1.03). The average resting sV˙O2sV˙O2 was similar to previously published metabolic measurements from the same species. Our data indicate that the resting metabolic rate for a 150 kg dolphin would be 3.9 ml O2 min−1 kg−1, and the metabolic rate for active animals, assuming a multiplier of 3–6, would range from 11.7 to 23.4 ml O2 min−1 kg−1.absbreak Our measurements provide novel data for resting energy use and respiratory physiology in wild cetaceans, which may have significant value for conservation efforts and for understanding the bioenergetic requirements of this species. Citation: Measuring metabolism in dolphins to calculate their caloric needs (2018, January 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-metabolism-dolphins-caloric.htmlcenter_img Bottlenose Dolphin – Tursiops truncatus. A dolphin surfs the wake of a research boat on the Banana River – near the Kennedy Space Center. Credit: Public Domain A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one in Spain has measured the metabolism of wild bottlenose dolphins in an effort to better understand their caloric needs. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes measuring the dolphins, what they found, and explain how their findings can help with conservation efforts. Journal information: Royal Society Open Science This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more