How ParentingWeekly Drove Online CPMs Over 30

first_img“When someone registers on ParentingWeekly, we provide a panel of different offers and the technology collects the data and sends it to the advertiser,” says Zephrin Lasker, co-founder and CEO of Pontiflex.The publisher side requires placing a piece of Javascript. “I’m no Web engineer but I could place the code in the page and get it up and running,” says ParentingWeekly program manager Marlyss Bird. “It’s transparent, we’re not sneaking subscriber names in.”Participating Pontiflex advertisers include brands such as Kimblerly-Clark. Pontiflex operates on a cost-per-lead model. While it won’t reveal the range, Pontiflex pays the publisher for the lead, takes a markup on that, and then passes it along to the advertiser.CPMs have since rise to $31 on ParentingWeekly. “This is not displacing any existing placement, we’re treating this as ‘found money,’” says Bird. Ad networks are an easy way for publishers to generate ancillary revenue online, but the ubiquity of those same ad networks is also driving down the price of online advertising. Geo- and demographic-targeting is all the rage, but forcing ads on readers who haven’t requested them can alienate an audience quickly.ParentingWeekly, a registration-based online destination for expecting parents with an audience of more than 1.9 million, has teamed with Pontiflex, an e-mail and social acquisition platform, to leverage its sign-up advertising technology. Users are able to sign up directly within the ad, while staying on the ParentingWeekly site. The Pontiflex-enabled ads appear on the registration “thank you” pages, sweepstakes sections and on the “Steals and Deals” page. Users can receive additional information on the products.last_img read more

Chariot the private bus startup for commuters to shutter operations

first_imgChariot has operations in 10 US cities and in London. Ford Chariot, the private bus startup, is going out of business.On Thursday, CEO Dan Grossman announced Chariot will cease all operations by the end of the March. The decision to close the service was made after “significant consideration,” he wrote in a blog post. It appears the company’s business model wasn’t viable.”It has become clear — through many indicators such as ridership — that the mobility services delivered by Chariot over the past five years will not be a sustainable solution going forward,” a Chariot spokeswoman said in an email.Chariot’s goal was to provide an alternative to public transportation for a slightly higher fee — usually between $1.50 to $3 more per ride. The service launched in San Francisco in April 2014 and has since spread to nine other US cities and to London. Ford acquired Chariot for $65 million in September 2016.The company focused on shuttling commuters from outer neighborhoods to downtown areas and financial districts using midsized vans. Grossman said Chariot provided more than 3 million rides over the past five years. Some urban planners have criticized the company for catering to affluent clientele and unfairly competing with cities’ public transit systems.The startup tussled with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency last year for running routes along city bus lines, according to the San Francisco Examiner. This caused the city agency to establish new regulations that barred Chariot from creating any more routes that mirrored public transit lines. “We are going to continue to do our work to provide and improve Muni [public transit] service for more than 730,000 riders a day across the city,” SFMTA spokesman Paul Rose said of Chariot’s closure. “We will continue working to ensure that our service is easy, convenient and affordable for all San Franciscans across the city.”Chariot isn’t the only private shuttle startup to end operations. Competitor Leap, which launched a luxury bus service (complete with Blue Bottle coffee and cold-pressed juices) in San Francisco in 2014, also closed. Leap was forced to shut down in 2015 after not securing proper operating permits from the state of California.Grossman said Chariot will halt all of its bus routes in the UK on Jan. 25, followed by a US shutdown of service on Feb. 1. All other operations at the company will terminate by the end of March.First published Jan. 10, 3:21 p.m. PT. Update, 5:12 p.m.: Adds comment from a Chariot spokeswoman and from SFMTA spokesman Paul Rose.CNET Magazine: Check out a sampling of the stories you’ll find in CNET’s newsstand edition.The Smartest Stuff: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you, and the things around you, smarter. Share your voice Tags 1center_img Comment Mobile Roadshowlast_img read more

See the forgotten NASA Apollo 11 crew photo found at the bottom

first_img The crew. Found this at the bottom of a box. Don’t think it was ever used by @NASA. #TBT @TheRealBuzz pic.twitter.com/ZXINsWPcix— Michael Collins (@AstroMCollins) June 13, 2019 Tags NASA Space No, I’m headed to Mars.Thanks for the question, Sam! #AskMichaelCollins pic.twitter.com/8E84AZz3QH— Michael Collins (@AstroMCollins) June 12, 2019 National Selfie Day: Striking space selfies snapped beyond Earth Michael Collins found this photo in a box. NASA Share your voice The timing for the photo’s reemergence is perfect as we head toward the 50th anniversary of the moon landing in July. Collins has been very active on Twitter, recently saying he wouldn’t return to the moon if given the chance because he’s instead heading for Mars. It shows his enthusiasm for space hasn’t waned in the decades since he traveled to the moon. How NASA got to the moon, and its plans to go back See Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 spacesuit all fixed up 15 Photoscenter_img 0 “The crew. Found this at the bottom of a box. Don’t think it was ever used by NASA,” Collins wrote. This exact photo doesn’t seem to appear on the NASA website, but you can find other poses from the same shoot.The photo shows Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin off to one side and Collins with his arm casually reaching over a large mock-up of the moon. Collins’ signature runs across the top.  Post a comment To the Moon It’s customary for NASA astronauts to snap a few glamour photos ahead of a big mission, and it didn’t get much bigger than 1969’s Apollo 11 mission to land humans on the moon. Command module pilot Michael Collins rediscovered an old photo of his famous crew and shared it on Twitter on Thursday. More on Apollo 11 Sci-Tech This story is part of To the Moon, a series exploring humanity’s first journey to the lunar surface and our future living and working on the moon.last_img read more

Excess or poor sleep may up heart disease

first_imgToo much or too little sleep can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and early death, according to a study of over 116,000 people from across the world published recently. The researchers found that people who slept for longer than the recommended duration of six to eight hours a day had an increased risk of early death or developing diseases of the heart or blood vessels in the brain. Compared to people who slept for the recommended time, those who slept a total of eight to nine hours a day had a five Also Read – Add new books to your shelf per cent increased risk; people sleeping between nine and ten hours a day had an increased risk of 17 per cent and those sleeping more than ten hours a day had a 41 per cent increased risk. They also found a nine per cent increased risk for people who slept a total of six or fewer hours, but this finding was not statistically significant. Before adjusting for factors that might affect the results, the researchers found that for every 1,000 people sleeping six or fewer hours a night, 9.4 developed cardiovascular disease (CVD) or died per year. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThis occurred in 7.8 of those sleeping six to eight hours, 8.4 of those sleeping eight to nine hours, 10.4 of those sleeping nine to ten hours and 14.8 of those sleeping more than ten hours. “Our study shows that the optimal duration of estimated sleep is six to eight hours per day for adults,” said Chuangshi Wang, a PhD student at McMaster University in Canada. “Given that this is an observational study that can only show an association rather than proving a causal relationship, we cannot say that too much sleep per se causes cardiovascular diseases,” Wang said, lead author of the study published in the European Heart Journal. “However, too little sleep could be an underlying contributor to death and cases of cardiovascular disease, and too much sleep may indicate underlying conditions that increase risk,” she said. Associations between sleep and death or cardiovascular and other diseases have been suggested by other studies, but results have been contradictory. In addition, they tended to look at particular populations and did not necessarily take account of the fact that in some countries daytime napping can be common and considered healthy. The study looked at a total of 116,632 adults aged between 35 and 70 years in 21 countries with different income levels in seven geographic regions (North America and Europe, South America, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China and Africa). During an average (median) follow-up time of nearly eight years, 4,381 people died and 4,365 suffered a major cardiovascular problem such as a heart attack or stroke. Researchers found that regular daytime naps were more common in the Middle East, China, Southeast Asia and South America. The duration of daytime naps varied mainly from 30 to 60 minutes. People who slept six or fewer hours at night, but took a daytime nap, and so slept an average of 6.4 hours a day in total, had a slightly increased risk compared to those who slept between six and eight hours at night without a daytime nap, but this finding was not statistically significant. “Although daytime napping was associated with higher risks of death or cardiovascular problems in those with sufficient or longer sleep at night, this was not the case in people who slept under six hours at night,” Wang said. “In these individuals, a daytime nap seemed to compensate for the lack of sleep at night and to mitigate the risks,” she further added.last_img read more

Amazon buys Eero mesh router startup adding fuel to its inhouse Alexa

first_imgAmazon has announced its plans of acquiring ‘Eero’, the startup that is focussed on mesh home routers.  Eero makes use of a mesh network to produce wireless routers and extenders that provide better coverage for home Wi-Fi networks and makes it easy to have fast and reliable Wi-Fi all over the house. Eero routers are designed to overcome coverage and dead zone issues encountered through traditional routers. Multiple access points are used to provide coverage to an entire home or apartment with a strong Wi-Fi signal. Amazon says that this deal will “help customers better connect smart home devices.” It will make it easier to set up Alexa-compatible gadgets if Amazon also controls the router technology. Amazon SVP Dave Limp said in a press release that “We are incredibly impressed with the Eero team and how quickly they invented a WiFi solution that makes connected devices just work. We have a shared vision that the smart home experience can get even easier, and we’re committed to continuing innovating on behalf of customers.” While the deal is good news for Amazon investors, many Eero users have expressed their disapproval of the deal. Amazon has faced criticism about how Alexa listens in people’s homes, and can be a threat to user privacy. Existing Eero users have voiced their concerns along the same lines: Eero support has tried to put customers worry to rest with a tweet, saying, “Eero does not track customers’ internet activity and this policy will not change with the acquisition”. Eero is not the first router startup to be acquired by Amazon. Amazon has acquired startups like  Ring and Blink, in recent years, with a vision to launch its own in-house Alexa smart home ecosystem. Details of the deal have yet to be disclosed. Head over to Techcrunch for more insights on this news. Read Next “Amazon wants to make all the rules and weaken democracy in NYC”: Brad Lander on Amazon’s HQ2 deal Aurora, a self-driving startup, secures $530 million in funding from Amazon, Sequoia, and T. Rowe Price among others Amazon faces increasing public pressure as HQ2 plans go under the scanner in New Yorklast_img read more