Ft Monmouth LRA Hopes to Revive Army Barracks as Cultural Center

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A row of World War II-era barracks at the former Fort Monmouth on the northern New Jersey coast that had been slated to be torn down instead may be converted into a cultural center.The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority, which recently put the 4.4-acre site up for sale, is looking for an entity that is interested in turning the property into a cultural center for art, music, entertainment or a museum, reported the Asbury Park Press. The property includes Soldiers Park, which a new landowner would be required to preserve. Alternatively, a buyer could convey the park to a public entity to maintain. The two-story wood frame buildings, located in the Eatontown portion of the property, were built in 1942. The Army converted them into administrative space following the war. A small portion of the site sits in Oceanport, but the LRA intends to work with the two municipalities to adjust the boundary so that it lies entirely in Eatontown.One entity has expressed interest so far, said Eatontown Mayor Dennis Connelly. “It will be a good addition to town,” Connelly said.last_img read more

Joint Chiefs Chairman Confirmation Hearing Scheduled July 11

first_imgThe Senate Armed Services Committee announced Friday it will hold its confirmation hearing for Army Gen. Mark Milley to become the next Joint Chiefs chairman on July 11, after the panel’s return from the July 4 congressional recess.Gen. Milley, who has served as the Army’s chief of staff since 2015, would replace Marine Corps Gen. Joseph Dunford who finishes his term at the end of September.The rotation in the Pentagon’s military leadership comes as DOD has been navigating recent transition in the agency’s senior civilian leadership.Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who previously served as Secretary of the Army, became DOD’s chief when the White House appointed him to the post after former Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan unexpectedly resigned in June.Esper’s selection to lead DOD has been received with positive reviews from both sides of the aisle, according to The Hill.The Senate’s Armed Services Chair James Inhofe (R-Okla.) has lauded Esper as having a very good relationship with the troops and House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith (D-Wash.) has been pleased with Esper’s selection to lead DOD.Though the White House has announced it intends to nominate Esper to become the Pentagon’s permanent chief, it has yet to send the formal paperwork to the Senate.Army photo by Spc. Dana Clarke ADC AUTHORlast_img read more

Google jumps on the foldable phone bandwagon files patent

first_img Foldable Phones Tablets Phones Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: Google Samsung Post a comment 0center_img More foldable phones coming from Samsung Google’s patent application included several sketches of a potential foldable device. Google Samsung’s Galaxy Fold made a splash at Unpacked in February. Since then, more foldable phones have been unveiled as companies grab at the latest phone trend. Google may be looking to toss its hat in the foldable ring, according to a patent application discovered by Patently Mobile on Tuesday. While a patent application doesn’t mean anything is set in stone, it does mean Google is at least thinking about a foldable device. The patent, published in December, describes the device like so: “[a] foldable display of a computing device includes a back stiffening layer, a transparent frontplate layer, a transparent cover window layer, and an OLED display layer disposed between the back stiffening layer and the transparent frontplate layer.” Several sketches included in the patent show a device that seems to fold like a book or wallet. Another sketch shows the device folded in a “Z” shape. Google didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 3:13 Tagslast_img read more

HP Inc says to accelerate job cuts by 2016

first_imgHP Inc said it was accelerating its restructuring programme and now expects about 3,000 people will exit by the end of fiscal 2016 instead of over three years as it announced in September.Then, Hewlett-Packard Co had said it expected to cut about 33,300 jobs over three years, of which up to 3,300 were to be cut in HP Inc. It said then that 1,200 people would leave the company by the end of 2016.The restructuring will result in charges and associated cash payments of about $300 million in the current year, the company said.”This move is basically HP Inc embracing the tough pricing environment and shifting their focus to building their portfolio,” says Shannon Cross, an analyst for Cross Research.HP Inc, which houses former Hewlett-Packard Co’s legacy hardware business, reported a near 12 percent drop in quarterly revenue, as it struggles with weak demand for PCs and printers.Revenue in the company’s personal systems business fell 13 percent in the first quarter ended Jan. 31, while it declined 17 percent in its printing division from a year earlier.PC sales have been falling sharply worldwide, and the launch of Windows 10 has so far failed to rekindle demand.Printer demand has been hurt as corporate customers cut printing costs and consumers shift to mobile devices.The company, which is reporting results independently for the first time since being spun off from Hewlett-Packard Co, forecast adjusted profit of 35-40 cents per share for its second quarter ending April 30.Analysts on average were expecting 39 cents, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.HP Inc maintained its 2016 adjusted profit forecast at $1.59-$1.69 per share.The company’s earnings from continuing operations fell to $650 million, or 36 cents per share, in the first quarter from $770 million, or 41 cents per share, a year earlier.Revenue fell to $12.25 billion from $13.86 billion.Analysts on average had expected earnings of 36 cents per share and revenue of $12.20 billion.HP Inc’s shares were marginally lower at $10.75 in extended trading on Wednesday. They had fallen more than 13 percent since the spinoff in early November to Wednesday.Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Co, also spun off from Hewlett-Packard Co, is expected to report results on March 3.last_img read more

Refugees not welcome in Japan

first_imgIt has been a decade since Liliane last saw her little girl. She fled Africa in fear for her life, leaving behind everything she knew and loved in the hope of a fresh start in Japan.Today, she scrapes a living from dead-end jobs, and what Japanese she knows has been snatched from television shows. There is little government help for people like her: free language courses are limited, social housing is hard to find, discrimination is rife.Yet Liliane is regarded as one of the lucky ones — she was granted refugee status in Japan, a country which refuses more than 99 percent of cases.”It has not been easy,” she tells AFP, speaking under a pseudonym.She adds: “Here they do not pay for your studies, they do not help you to get bank loans, or give you social housing… we are left to ourselves, we have to fight alone.”Anti-refugee sentiment is rising in Europe and the United States but in Japan those seeking haven from tyranny and war have long faced daunting legal and social gauntlets.One of the world’s wealthiest countries, Japan accepted just 28 refugees in 2016 — one more than the previous year — out of the 8,193 applications reviewed by the Immigration Bureau.Officials defend the low number, saying applicants are mainly from Asian countries seeking access to Japan solely for economic reasons.”The number of applications from regions which generate lots of refugees, such as Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, is small,” said Yasuhiro Hishida, spokesman for the Immigration Bureau.- Fleeing persecution -Assisted by the UN, Liliane was able to claim asylum on arrival in Japan stating that her life was in danger due to tribal conflict back home. It took two years for officials to accept her as a refugee, a period during which she received assistance from the Catholic Church and charities.But she feels the status brought few benefits. She is no closer to reuniting with her child — now a teenager, her daughter has repeatedly been denied a permit to even visit.For Liliane, further education and a stable life, seem out of reach.She explains: “Japan is a very difficult country for foreigners. The language is really a handicap for us. You need to do absolutely everything to try to speak in Japanese but you don’t know where to find free lessons.””Sometimes I think refugee status has no meaning,” she sighs.But for Nonnon, being awarded refugee status would at least give her a sense of belonging.She fled military persecution in her native Myanmar 25 years ago but remains in frustrating legal limbo, accepted only on a humanitarian stay visa, which allows for residence and work but traditionally only on annual temporary permits subject to anxiety-riven renewal.”It’s like I have no nationality,” said the 47-year-old, who only gave her childhood nickname.She has tried to forge a life in Japan, she married a man from Myanmar who was also claiming asylum and they have a son and a daughter. But their children are effectively stateless — not recognised in Myanmar, nor as Japanese citizens.Refugee advocates say Japan’s system is too harsh.Lawyer Shogo Watanabe is helping a woman from Myanmar’s Kachin minority who says she risks sexual assault by soldiers fighting ethnic minority militias if she goes home.”To me, the risk of getting raped by someone who is a member of the military is a legitimate reason to be a refugee,” he said of her plight.”But immigration officials say you need to prove that she is actually targeted by the military.”- ‘Closed doors’-Critics also say current government policy ignores the country’s need for immigrants as the population shrinks.”Japan has kept a mindset of closing doors to foreigners as it is an island nation that until recently had ample population,” said Hidenori Sakanaka, a former Justice Ministry official who heads a pro-immigration think tank.The population is set to decline to 87 million by 2060 from 127 million today.He added that Japan must “accept more migrants, which would make society more open to multiple cultures and… to accepting more refugees”.The first Justice Ministry survey into discrimination against foreigners, released in March, found that 30 percent said they had been on the receiving end of discriminatory remarks.One in four of the respondents that had sought employment, believed they did not get the job because they were not Japanese.”For us with our black skin, it is a bit difficult. Sometimes when I sit on the train, some Japanese switch seats,” Liliane reveals, though she adds she has never feared for her safety, which is a major concern for asylum seekers in Europe.She says she was overlooked for teaching work, despite her fluency in English, when employers realised she is African.Nonnon, who currently works in a nail salon, recalls being paid less than Japanese workers for doing the same job. She contrasts her situation to that of family members who escaped to other countries.”My relatives in America and Australia were given refugee status and they are naturalised. They can get a job, buy a house and travel overseas,” she said, adding: “They can live as normal people. I want to live like a normal person.”last_img read more

State Senator Students Will Play Critical Role In Preventing Future School Shootings

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X 00:00 /09:25 Listen REUTERS/Jonathan BachmanTen roses left in memory of the victims killed in a shooting at the Santa Fe High School.center_img In the aftermath of the school shooting in Santa Fe, Gov. Greg Abbott is hosting a series of roundtable discussions about preventing future such incidents. Republican State Sen. Larry Taylor represents the 11th District, which includes Santa Fe. He told Houston Matters host Craig Cohen he’s open to the possibility of a special session of the Texas Legislature, should the governor call one to address this issue. Lawmakers aren’t scheduled to be in session until January.Taylor said the idea of the roundtables is to bring in stakeholders and experts from various backgrounds — from educators, to security experts, to mental health professionals.“It’s such a complex issue there’s not one answer,” he said. “And, if there was one answer, it might work for one campus but not work for another. So, it’s just very multifaceted. So, bring in all these people in — hopefully in a spirit of unity — to try and find some real solutions and not argue about some of the things that people argue about.”He said some people have suggested putting metal detectors at all schools, but that might not work at every campus and at every district. Others have suggested doors with limited access during school hours, but there are challenges to that at some campuses.“Each school is going to have to do an assessment of their own campuses and what’s going to work best in those campuses,” Taylor said.He said students will play an important role in improving school safety too. And they might have to get used to a new reality of heightened awareness, much like many adults did after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.“Look out for your fellow students,” he said. “When you see lonely students or loner-type students walk up to them, talk to them, see if you can’t develop relationships with them. And, frankly, when you see changes in people’s personality or how they’re dressing all of a sudden make people aware because no one knows the fellow student better than the other students. And I think they’re going to have to be our first line of defense.” Sharelast_img read more

Black Students More Likely to Face Discipline Less Likely to Receive Treatment

first_imgjhunter@afro.comTwitter: @hunter_jonathan Black students face harsher punishments than their peers and are less likely to receive mental health attention for their problems, according to new research.According to the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, Black students are expelled and suspended three times more often than White students. And a new study published in the journal Sociology of Education found that school districts with large Black populations were less likely to consider offering counseling services compared to predominantly White school districts. School districts in which a large portion of the students were Black would usually report incidents to law enforcement officers—not the case in majority White school districts.The study, entitled “The Social Structure of Criminalized and Medicalized School Data” examined how “district level racial/ethnic and socioeconomic compositions” affect the method of discipline implemented on students.  The study was conducted by David Ramey, an assistant professor of sociology and justice at Penn State University. Ramey examined data from 60,000 schools in more than 6,000 school districts, and concluded that that the increased incarceration rates in minority communities results in a criminalized view of students when they misbehave.According to the study, unlike White parents, the families of Black children are less likely to blame their behavior on medical or psychological causes.“The legacy of the Tuskegee experiments has left many Black families skeptical of medical and mental research, particularly contested and controversial issues like ADHD,” Ramey wrote in his report.Ramey also noted that research suggests that teachers view Black boys’ misbehavior as the result of bad parenting and cultural deficiencies, and are less likely to attribute minority students’ acting up to a behavior disorder.“White kids tend to get viewed as having ADHD, or having some sort of behavioral problem, while Black kids are viewed as being unruly and unwilling to learn,” said Ramey.According to The Daily Best, Black students with learning disabilities are three times more likely to be suspended than White students with learning disabilities. Ramey suggests that the current discipline structure of American schools is flawed.“There’s been a real push toward school safety and there’s been a real push for schools to show they are being accountable,” he wrote. “But, any zero-tolerance policy or mandatory top-down solutions might be undermining what would be otherwise good efforts at discipline, and not establishing an environment based around all the options available.”last_img read more

Maryland Hispanic Business Conference

first_imgThe 14th annual Maryland Hispanic Business Conference is on September 8 in Bethesda North Marriott Hotel and Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Rd. Bethesda, MD 20852. The conference provides tools, strategies and resources to better support Hispanic and minority businesses. For more information call (301) 947-6619 or visit www.mdhbc.com.last_img