Joint Chiefs Chairman Confirmation Hearing Scheduled July 11

first_imgThe Senate Armed Services Committee announced Friday it will hold its confirmation hearing for Army Gen. Mark Milley to become the next Joint Chiefs chairman on July 11, after the panel’s return from the July 4 congressional recess.Gen. Milley, who has served as the Army’s chief of staff since 2015, would replace Marine Corps Gen. Joseph Dunford who finishes his term at the end of September.The rotation in the Pentagon’s military leadership comes as DOD has been navigating recent transition in the agency’s senior civilian leadership.Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who previously served as Secretary of the Army, became DOD’s chief when the White House appointed him to the post after former Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan unexpectedly resigned in June.Esper’s selection to lead DOD has been received with positive reviews from both sides of the aisle, according to The Hill.The Senate’s Armed Services Chair James Inhofe (R-Okla.) has lauded Esper as having a very good relationship with the troops and House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith (D-Wash.) has been pleased with Esper’s selection to lead DOD.Though the White House has announced it intends to nominate Esper to become the Pentagon’s permanent chief, it has yet to send the formal paperwork to the Senate.Army photo by Spc. Dana Clarke ADC AUTHORlast_img read more

See the forgotten NASA Apollo 11 crew photo found at the bottom

first_img The crew. Found this at the bottom of a box. Don’t think it was ever used by @NASA. #TBT @TheRealBuzz pic.twitter.com/ZXINsWPcix— Michael Collins (@AstroMCollins) June 13, 2019 Tags NASA Space No, I’m headed to Mars.Thanks for the question, Sam! #AskMichaelCollins pic.twitter.com/8E84AZz3QH— Michael Collins (@AstroMCollins) June 12, 2019 National Selfie Day: Striking space selfies snapped beyond Earth Michael Collins found this photo in a box. NASA Share your voice The timing for the photo’s reemergence is perfect as we head toward the 50th anniversary of the moon landing in July. Collins has been very active on Twitter, recently saying he wouldn’t return to the moon if given the chance because he’s instead heading for Mars. It shows his enthusiasm for space hasn’t waned in the decades since he traveled to the moon. How NASA got to the moon, and its plans to go back See Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 spacesuit all fixed up 15 Photoscenter_img 0 “The crew. Found this at the bottom of a box. Don’t think it was ever used by NASA,” Collins wrote. This exact photo doesn’t seem to appear on the NASA website, but you can find other poses from the same shoot.The photo shows Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin off to one side and Collins with his arm casually reaching over a large mock-up of the moon. Collins’ signature runs across the top.  Post a comment To the Moon It’s customary for NASA astronauts to snap a few glamour photos ahead of a big mission, and it didn’t get much bigger than 1969’s Apollo 11 mission to land humans on the moon. Command module pilot Michael Collins rediscovered an old photo of his famous crew and shared it on Twitter on Thursday. More on Apollo 11 Sci-Tech This story is part of To the Moon, a series exploring humanity’s first journey to the lunar surface and our future living and working on the moon.last_img read more

Data shows fewer tornado days in US but more per event over

first_img Tornados happen in many places, but because of its unique geography, the U.S. has more than any other country—mainly due to the lack of a large mountain dividing east and west. There has been speculation recently, that global warming is causing more tornados to occur—though it has also been suggested it only seems that way because of how quickly information about tornadic events disseminates in the modern era. The trio at NOAA decided to let hard facts tell the story. They collected weather data from the national storm database, which goes back to 1954, to see if they could coax out any patterns (they only included tornados at least as strong as an F1).As it turns out, the trio did find a pattern, they say the data shows very clearly that the U.S. actually has a trend of having fewer days in which there is a tornado over the past two decades—that’s the good news. The bad news is that on days when there is a tornado, there are more than there used to be. The data shows that back in the 1970’s there were just .6 days a year that had 30 or more tornados—after the turn of the century, that number had risen to 3 days per year. Curiously, the numbers suggest that the country still experiences on average, the same number of tornadoes each year, approximately 1,200—they’re just spread out differently. They also noted that the beginning and end of the tornado “season” in recent years has fluctuated more wildly than the years prior to that.The researchers cannot say of course why the spread of tornados has changed in the U.S., though some might suggest it’s due to global warming or even changes in atmospheric conditions in parts of the country due to pollution or other unknown factors. What is clear, is that something is causing a change, and there is now evidence of it, providing a path for moving forward for better understanding what is really going on. Magazine reporting below average numbers of tornados in 2013 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Image: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, via Wikimedia Journal information: Science More information: Science 17 October 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6207 pp. 349-352. DOI: 10.1126/science.1257460center_img © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Data shows fewer tornado days in U.S. but more per event over past couple decades (2014, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-tornado-days-event-couple-decades.html Explore further A trio of researches with the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that though there are fewer total days per year when tornados occur in the U.S., the number that occur on days when there are tornados has increased over the past couple of decades. In their paper published in the journal Science, Harold Brooks, Gregory Carbin and Patrick Marsh describe how they studied weather data over the past half century and what they found when looking for trends.last_img read more