BSE closes points 1605 down on April 7

first_imgNew Delhi, April 7 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 16.05 points down to stand at 22,343.45. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed up 0.70 points up to stand at6, 695.05. Suzlon Energy and Strides Arco were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 12.40% and 8.02% along with Jaiprakash Associates and GMR Infrastructure with an increase of 5.40% and 5.38% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Jindal Steel and Future Retail with a decrease of 5.93% and 5.46% along with Prestige Estates and Crompton Greaves with a decrease of 4.90% and 3.72% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 13.96 points at 13,264.91 while the banking sector is down 56.91 points at 14,305.35 and the realty sector is down 20.89 points at 1,505.71. The Indian currency is down 0.17% at Rs 60.19 per dollar.last_img read more

Dear Comrade crashes big time on Tuesday earns less than iSmart Shankar

first_imgDear ComradeTwitterVijay Devarakonda’s Dear Comrade has hit the rock bottom at the box office in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana (AP/TS) on Tuesday and collected lesser amount than last week’s release iSmart Shankar.Dear Comrade opened to a big response in the Telugu states on July 26 and word of mouth helped it remain strong on the following days. Having made a good collection, the movie recovered around 60 per cent of the distributors’ investment in its opening weekend. But considering its hype and promotion, its business was not up to the mark. The distributors hoped that it will earn well on weekdays.But to their shock, Dear Comrade witnessed a steep decline in its collection at the AP/TS box office on Monday and its business hit the rock bottom on Tuesday. Andhra Box Office tweeted, “#DearComrade : Huge Drop on 1st Monday. Not Looking Good!.” Today it added, “#DearComrade Crashes on weekdays with some areas reporting Nett Figures lesser than Rentals.”Dear Comrade has failed to collect even Rs 50 lakh gross at the AP/TS box office on Tuesday. According to buzz on social media, it has just added Rs 25 lakhs to the total distributor share of Rs 13.85 crore in the Telugu States. Telugu 360_BO tweeted, “#DearComrade went down further on Tuesday with a distributor share of 25 lakhs in the Telugu States. 5 days AP/TS Share : 13.85 Cr Breakeven : 22.60 Cr.” iSmart ShankarTwitterAnother buzz on social media is that Ram Pothineni’s iSmart Shankar has collected more money than Dear Comrade in the Telugu state on its 13th days. Sai (@saipspk1638) tweeted, “#iSmartShankar Day 13>#DearComrade Day 4 in APTG Shocking collapse by #DearComrade.”The distributors have spent Rs 22.60 crore on its theatrical rights for the Telugu states. Dear Comrade has recovered 61.28 per cent of their investment. What is shocking about its collection is that the movie has just returned 1 per cent of their investment on Monday and Tuesday together. Considering its present trends, the film is heading to be a disaster and likely to incur huge losses to its distributors.last_img read more

Interdistrict bus services suspended for 2nd day

first_imgA stationary bus is seen in Gabtoli bus terminal. File PhotoPeople continued to suffer in the capital and elsewhere in the country as long-route bus services remain suspended for the second consecutive day on Saturday protesting alleged vandalism of vehicles during the ongoing student movement for safe road.Bus owners on Friday stopped operating long-route buses in different districts protesting ‘vandalism’ during the ongoing demonstrations of students demanding justice for their two fellows who were killed in a road crash in the capital.Although the bus operators resumed the service at night they suspend it again during daytime, reports UNB.In Dhaka, no long-route buses left from Mahakhali, Gabtoli and Sayedabad bus terminals in the morning, said officer-in-charges of Darus Salam police station Selim-uz-Zaman, and Jatrabari police station Kazi Wazed.Besides, the bus services remained suspended in Chuadanga and Mymensingh for third the consecutive day while those in Khulna, Natore, Joypurhat and Chapainawabagnj for the second day.last_img read more

Excess or poor sleep may up heart disease

first_imgToo much or too little sleep can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and early death, according to a study of over 116,000 people from across the world published recently. The researchers found that people who slept for longer than the recommended duration of six to eight hours a day had an increased risk of early death or developing diseases of the heart or blood vessels in the brain. Compared to people who slept for the recommended time, those who slept a total of eight to nine hours a day had a five Also Read – Add new books to your shelf per cent increased risk; people sleeping between nine and ten hours a day had an increased risk of 17 per cent and those sleeping more than ten hours a day had a 41 per cent increased risk. They also found a nine per cent increased risk for people who slept a total of six or fewer hours, but this finding was not statistically significant. Before adjusting for factors that might affect the results, the researchers found that for every 1,000 people sleeping six or fewer hours a night, 9.4 developed cardiovascular disease (CVD) or died per year. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThis occurred in 7.8 of those sleeping six to eight hours, 8.4 of those sleeping eight to nine hours, 10.4 of those sleeping nine to ten hours and 14.8 of those sleeping more than ten hours. “Our study shows that the optimal duration of estimated sleep is six to eight hours per day for adults,” said Chuangshi Wang, a PhD student at McMaster University in Canada. “Given that this is an observational study that can only show an association rather than proving a causal relationship, we cannot say that too much sleep per se causes cardiovascular diseases,” Wang said, lead author of the study published in the European Heart Journal. “However, too little sleep could be an underlying contributor to death and cases of cardiovascular disease, and too much sleep may indicate underlying conditions that increase risk,” she said. Associations between sleep and death or cardiovascular and other diseases have been suggested by other studies, but results have been contradictory. In addition, they tended to look at particular populations and did not necessarily take account of the fact that in some countries daytime napping can be common and considered healthy. The study looked at a total of 116,632 adults aged between 35 and 70 years in 21 countries with different income levels in seven geographic regions (North America and Europe, South America, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China and Africa). During an average (median) follow-up time of nearly eight years, 4,381 people died and 4,365 suffered a major cardiovascular problem such as a heart attack or stroke. Researchers found that regular daytime naps were more common in the Middle East, China, Southeast Asia and South America. The duration of daytime naps varied mainly from 30 to 60 minutes. People who slept six or fewer hours at night, but took a daytime nap, and so slept an average of 6.4 hours a day in total, had a slightly increased risk compared to those who slept between six and eight hours at night without a daytime nap, but this finding was not statistically significant. “Although daytime napping was associated with higher risks of death or cardiovascular problems in those with sufficient or longer sleep at night, this was not the case in people who slept under six hours at night,” Wang said. “In these individuals, a daytime nap seemed to compensate for the lack of sleep at night and to mitigate the risks,” she further added.last_img read more

Upwork to Charge Freelancers to Bid on Jobs Further Squeezing Those Who

first_img 8 min read April 3, 2019 Listen Now Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger.center_img This story was updated on April 24, 2019.Global freelancing platform Upwork announced a sweeping policy change on Tuesday that will impact hundreds of thousands of freelancers — particularly new and/or low-earning users.“Connects,” the virtual tokens freelancers use to submit proposals for jobs, will no longer be free beginning sometime between May and June 2019. Instead, Connects will cost $0.15 each — and depending on the job they’re submitting for, freelancers will need between one and six tokens to apply. For the most in-demand jobs, that translates to a little less than $1 per submission.That’s a significant departure from the old model, which provided 60 free Connects as part of the Freelancer Basic plan. In an economy where three in 10 adults take on freelance or “gig” work — “generally as a supplemental source of income,” according to a Federal Reserve report — it’s a tough blow, especially in states such as Georgia, where the minimum wage is just $5.15. Upwork says that on average, most freelancers will spend about $5 or less per month on Connects, but the company didn’t provide details on how it calculated that figure.As for the reason? The freelancing platform, which counts companies including Dropbox, Airbnb, General Electric and Microsoft among its clients, wrote in an email to users: “We want to help professional freelancers like you win more jobs. With paid Connects, we expect freelancers will submit fewer proposals, increasing your likelihood of winning projects and making it easier for clients to identify high-quality talent.”In the message, the company seems to acknowledge that the new pricing structure will deter a significant number of users from applying for jobs on the platform — and implies that Upwork believes freelancers who can eat the new cost of tokens are inherently higher-quality talent.In an online Q&A session about the policy change for users on Thursday, vice president of product Jessica Tiwari said, “I actually do not believe that this change will make it harder for new freelancers,” mentioning that many of Upwork’s clients had expressed feeling overwhelmed by the number of proposals they received in response to a posted project. Many projects receive between 50 and 100 proposals, she said, and many clients sort results to favor the amount of experience a freelancer has on the platform. Because of that, “those new freelancers are at a disadvantage immediately,” Tiwari said. Upwork will also offer a free 20-pack of Connects to new freelancers on the platform.In a statement to Entrepreneur, Upwork wrote, “It’s worth noting that when a freelancer is invited to a job, there is no cost to submit a proposal.” But there is a limit to the number of invitations that clients can send to freelancers. It’s typically three per posted project, but Upwork says the exact number will vary based on the client and on the job itself.The company’s decision has incited controversy on social media and among its freelancers.So, #freelancers, now that @Upwork is charging fees to apply for work on top of fees for contracts, what are your favorite Upwork alternatives? Looks like I’ll be turning my attention to clients I can find elsewhere.— Holly Riddle (@TheHollyRiddle) April 2, 2019I guess @Upwork have never heard the phrase “don’t bite the hand that feeds you”. Outrageous changes on their way. Watch Freelance talent flee to competitive platforms in their droves. #upwork— Craig Rich (@craigrich) April 2, 2019Wow. @Upwork just decided to start charging freelancers to apply for jobs. So not only are they collecting on each contract, they’re collecting just from the applications for each contract. Unreal.— Eric Fadden (@ericfadden) April 2, 2019“When I was just starting out as a freelancer, I wouldn’t have paid to apply for jobs because I had no leeway in my budget,” wrote Jennifer Collins, an Upwork user, in a message to Entrepreneur, adding that the company already charges a 20 percent fee on new contracts. “Now, I have the luxury to walk away and not buy Connects, and I suspect that many expert freelancers are moving to do the same.”In Upwork’s annual investor report, CEO Stephane Kasriel wrote that “now is the time for all of us to work together to ensure the best possible future for the billions of workers in the world, their families, and the generations to come. Having become a public company in 2018, Upwork is now privileged to play a larger role than ever in steering this future.”The company’s 2018 public offering could be a driving factor behind the controversial change.In the investor report, Upwork cites that it operates the largest online marketplace as measured by gross services volume (GSV), ending 2018 with $1.8 billion. But after digging into the concrete definition of that metric, Entrepreneur found that GSV doesn’t just translate to client spend on marketplace offerings — it also includes “additional fees charged to both clients and freelancers for other services.” That umbrella clearly includes the new policy change charging freelancers for every proposal they submit.Upwork also clearly states in the report that its marketplace revenue is “primarily comprised” of service fees paid by its freelancers. “Therefore, marketplace revenue is correlated to GSV, and we believe that our marketplace revenue will grow as GSV grows.”One clear consequence of the change: Freelancers will likely increase their rates across the board to offset the new cost of submitting a proposal. That directly translates into more GSV — and more revenue — for the newly public company.Upwork may have taken that into account in its financial projections for investors. In its full-year results for 2018, the company reported $253.4 million in total revenue. It projects revenues of $298 million to $304 million for 2019.For its part, the company denies that the move is a cash-grab. In Thursday’s Q&A session, a significant amount of users asked about Upwork’s profits from the policy shift. Tiwari cited the current policy — that after users run out of free Connects, they can purchase additional ones for $1 each — and said that a significant amount of freelancers already pay for extra tokens. Therefore, Tiwari said the move is “revenue-neutral” for Upwork. “If this was a revenue play, I think we would’ve come up with something different.”When asked if other user fees will be done away with to compensate for the new policy, Tiwari said there were no current plans to do so.Many users asked about potential alternatives to charging freelancers for every Connect. For example, why not cap the number of proposals for each job and have the client open up the project for another batch of submissions if they’re not happy with the results? Tiwari said that incentivized speed rather than quality.​”I am definitely afraid of scaring off talent with this new policy,” Tiwari said. But she maintained that Upwork will continue to aim to have the best opportunities on its platform in order to retain users. Upwork also invited users to share their opinions on Upwork’s community page and said that the team reads every post.One freelancer, Murtaza Amin, created a user survey about the policy change that’s garnered 463 responses in just over three weeks. When asked to rate the company’s new Connects policy on a scale of one to 10, 55 percent of all respondents gave it a “one.” As for how Upwork fits into their future plans? Forty-five percent of respondents plan to explore other platform options after the announcement, but many freelancers lambast the lack of competition in the space. “The major problem with this new pricing change is that freelancers literally have nowhere else to go,” said Josh Reif, an Upwork user. Based on his experience, Reif guessed that Freelancer.com offers one-tenth to 1/100th as many listings as Upwork, depending on the niche. Another competitor, Fiverr, tends to promote quick or one-off projects at lower costs, shying away from longer-term or higher-earning freelance work. According to Upwork’s own 2018 study, commissioned in partnership with Freelancers Union, Americans spent 1.07 billion hours per week freelancing. Now, those hours will come at a higher cost. Problem Solvers with Jason Feiferlast_img read more