Mophie Juice Pack Access battery case coming soon to latest iPhones

first_img See It CES Products $999 $999 All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR See it 0 Sprint Tags 85 Photos The Juice Pack Access will come in multiple color options. Mophie Mophie will soon have a new battery case for the latest iPhones. The Juice Pack Access is set to ship before the end of March and has a built-in battery, wireless charging capabilities and is cut out at the bottom so you can use the Lighting port to plug the Lightning EarPods — or any other Lightning headphones. At $120, it definitely qualifies as a premium battery case. (No word on international pricing but we’ll add it as soon as we get it). The new design seems like a nice step forward for Mophie battery cases. It’s also worth noting that while you can charge both your case and phone by laying them on a Qi-enabled wireless charging pad, you can also charge the case via USB-C. A cable is included. mophie-juice-pack-access-portsEnlarge ImagePlug in those EarPods. Mophie Mophie Juice Pack Access key features Full access to Lightning portPriority+ charging will pass wireless and wired power to the iPhone firstEquipped with a built-in wireless receiver and transmitterCan charge your phone with any Qi-enabled wireless charger, including Mophie’s Charge Stream products USB-C input for wired chargingUsers may also charge the iPhone via the Lightning inputReduced height profile with dimensions more like a traditional case2,200-mAh battery for XS Max version Available during Q1 2019 for $120Comes in a variety of colors, including black, stone, gold, and dark red for the iPhone XS Max and iPhone X and XS, and black, blue, and red for the iPhone XR See It $999 $999 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Post a comment Boost Mobile Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Share your voice See It CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Apple iPhone XS Best Buy Mobile Accessories CES 2019last_img read more

Unimpressed By Oil Downturn Houston Retail Development Still Booming

first_img X 00:00 /01:54 Share Listen Florian MartinKroger employees cut the ribbon to a new Kroger Marketplace in Katy.Kroger just opened its fifth store in Greater Houston this year – and the grocery store chain has more planned. “We’ve made a commitment to invest over $500 million over the next five years, continuing to build stores just like this Kroger Marketplace,” Mike Krell, Kroger’s vice president of operations for the Houston division, said after a new store opening ceremony in Katy.And Kroger is not alone. According to real estate services firm JLL, the Houston area leads the nation in retail development activity.Simmi Jaggi, senior vice president with JLL, said many retailers stopped expanding during the Great Recession.“So since 2008, our city on a residential basis has exploded and done extremely well, with a lot of corridors that needed and had large demand for retail,” she said. “Those retailers are now coming in and filling in those pockets, so there’s been a tremendous amount of pent-up demand.”Jaggi says that’s true for retailers in general. Grocery stores actually kept expanding even during the recession.But will the strong retail growth in Houston continue?Jaggi expects it to slow down once the currently high need is satisfied, and the effect of the oil slump will probably catch up to retail as well – simply because fewer jobs mean fewer people move here, which will have an effect on demand for new stores.“If energy and office, if they have been impacted for the past 18 months, I would expect another 12 to 18 months and then we’ll see that more of a considerable slowdown with retail,” Jaggi said.For now, retailers are trying to come up with creative ideas to stay ahead of the growing competition, such as pickup windows or even drive-thrus at grocery stores. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: last_img read more

Data shows fewer tornado days in US but more per event over

first_img Tornados happen in many places, but because of its unique geography, the U.S. has more than any other country—mainly due to the lack of a large mountain dividing east and west. There has been speculation recently, that global warming is causing more tornados to occur—though it has also been suggested it only seems that way because of how quickly information about tornadic events disseminates in the modern era. The trio at NOAA decided to let hard facts tell the story. They collected weather data from the national storm database, which goes back to 1954, to see if they could coax out any patterns (they only included tornados at least as strong as an F1).As it turns out, the trio did find a pattern, they say the data shows very clearly that the U.S. actually has a trend of having fewer days in which there is a tornado over the past two decades—that’s the good news. The bad news is that on days when there is a tornado, there are more than there used to be. The data shows that back in the 1970’s there were just .6 days a year that had 30 or more tornados—after the turn of the century, that number had risen to 3 days per year. Curiously, the numbers suggest that the country still experiences on average, the same number of tornadoes each year, approximately 1,200—they’re just spread out differently. They also noted that the beginning and end of the tornado “season” in recent years has fluctuated more wildly than the years prior to that.The researchers cannot say of course why the spread of tornados has changed in the U.S., though some might suggest it’s due to global warming or even changes in atmospheric conditions in parts of the country due to pollution or other unknown factors. What is clear, is that something is causing a change, and there is now evidence of it, providing a path for moving forward for better understanding what is really going on. Magazine reporting below average numbers of tornados in 2013 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Image: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, via Wikimedia Journal information: Science More information: Science 17 October 2014: Vol. 346 no. 6207 pp. 349-352. DOI: 10.1126/science.1257460center_img © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Data shows fewer tornado days in U.S. but more per event over past couple decades (2014, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-10-tornado-days-event-couple-decades.html Explore further A trio of researches with the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that though there are fewer total days per year when tornados occur in the U.S., the number that occur on days when there are tornados has increased over the past couple of decades. In their paper published in the journal Science, Harold Brooks, Gregory Carbin and Patrick Marsh describe how they studied weather data over the past half century and what they found when looking for trends.last_img read more