Go back to the enewsletter Mandarin Oriental will

first_imgGo back to the e-newsletterMandarin Oriental will launch a Digital Detox initiative at all of its spas worldwide beginning 5 September 2016. The programme is designed to help guests find new ways to manage their relationship with technology and the stress that can come with a constantly connected digital lifestyle.Now, by booking any treatment at a Mandarin Oriental spa, guests can also access a range of wellness advice and activities designed to help them disconnect from technology. Mandarin Oriental has worked with the renowned Mayo Clinic on the creation of a range of tips and guidelines that can help establish personal boundaries on the use of technology, clear mental chatter and establish a healthy, digitally balanced lifestyle.The Digital Detox initiative encourages guests to surrender their phones on arrival at the spa, thus removing any online distractions. In the spa relaxation rooms, guests can access a full range of mindfulness activities such as journalling, note-card writing, colouring, meditation or simply relaxing and enjoying the silence. There will also be a selection of curated spa retail offerings, ranging from crystals and eye masks to meditation pillows and a selection of calming teas and oils. All have been chosen to encourage mindfulness and digital disconnection.For those who wish to immerse themselves more fully, a Digital Detox Retreat can be booked. This 80-minute experience focuses on grounding both body and mind through the power of human touch, and is designed to provide a calming and peaceful respite from the outside world and the stress of repetitive movements. The treatment includes relaxation in an aromatic bath, followed by a massage that concentrates on the head, eyes, neck, shoulders, hands and feet.On departure, inspired by tips on how to achieve a more digitally balanced life, guests can reclaim their cleaned device from the spa, repackaged in its own protective digital shielding. To further support this new Digital Detox initiative, The Spas at Mandarin Oriental will again offer an annual Silent Night event for the holiday season. On 14 December 2016 each spa will have a special silent retreat to remind guests about the importance of taking personal time for reflection, introspection and silence.Go back to the e-newsletterlast_img read more

Researchers describe new class of potent inhibitors against amyloid plaques

first_imgAug 9 2018Effective therapeutics to counteract the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes are not yet available. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now come a little bit closer to a solution: They have described a new class of designed macrocyclic peptides that are highly potent inhibitors of amyloid formation.Amyloid plaques, which are protein deposits, play a crucial role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes. Several teams of scientists around the world are working on finding ways to prevent amyloid plaque formation in the human brain.The research team of Aphrodite Kapurniotu, Professor for Peptide Biochemistry (TUM) has been working on an idea for some time now in collaboration with the teams of Professor Martin Zacharias (TUM), Professor Gerhard Rammes (TUM Rechts der Isar Hospital) and Professor Jürgen Bernhagen (Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research (ISD) at Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU)). The researchers present now macrocyclic peptides (MCIPs) as potent inhibitors of amyloid formation; they reported their results in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The work has been supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) collaborative research center SFB 1035.Related StoriesDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesResearchers discover new therapeutic target for treatment of Alzheimer’s diseaseNew class of amyloid inhibitorsIn its new study, the team presents macrocyclic peptides, developed as a new class of amyloid inhibitors. “We have discovered an MCIP that is stable in human blood plasma and can also overcome the human blood-brain barrier in an in vitro cell culture model,” explains Professor Kapurniotu. She adds: “So far we were ‘only’ able to demonstrate these properties in the test tube – thus further research is necessary. But these are two highly desirable properties for inhibitors of Alzheimer’s amyloid.”TUM has already applied for a patent for the newly developed macrocyclic peptides. “They could be a good alternative to the currently pursued antibody-based approaches as therapeutics against Alzheimer’s amyloid plaque formation because they are easy to produce, have promising properties and, due to their peptidic nature, they will be significantly cheaper than antibodies,” says Professor Kapurniotu.”Therefore, further investigations are now planned to verify whether the MCIPs are also effective in in vivo models. Furthermore, the MCIPs could also be suitable as templates for the development of small molecule peptidomimetics (molecules mimicking peptide chains), which might also find application as anti-amyloid drugs in Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes. Source:https://www.tum.de/nc/en/about-tum/news/press-releases/detail/article/34885/last_img read more